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Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / Rainsong guitars
Malarky

USA

DM Delker
Apr 19th, 2004 11:42 AM   Edit   Profile

Does anyone have info or critique on the graphite made Rainsong guitars. Sound, playability, construction, etc? I have seen these intruments but would like objective veiwpoints on the above points.
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / Rainsong guitars
Malarky

USA

DM Delker
Apr 19th, 2004 11:42 AM   Edit   Profile

Does anyone have info or critique on the graphite made Rainsong guitars. Sound, playability, construction, etc? I have seen these intruments but would like objective veiwpoints on the above points.
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / Rainsong guitars
Malarky

USA

DM Delker
Apr 19th, 2004 11:42 AM   Edit   Profile

Does anyone have info or critique on the graphite made Rainsong guitars. Sound, playability, construction, etc? I have seen these intruments but would like objective veiwpoints on the above points.
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / Rainsong guitars
Malarky

USA

DM Delker
Apr 19th, 2004 11:41 AM   Edit   Profile

Does anyone have info or critique on the graphite made Rainsong guitars. Sound, playability, construction, etc? I have seen these intruments but would like objective veiwpoints on the above points.
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / So what's the deal with Martin?
MarcO

USA - Kentucky

Love, Peace & Chicken Grease
Jan 6th, 2003 01:55 AM   Edit   Profile

Farmer Roy, I am not intentionally flaming Martin.
I have owned a Martin guitar and it was a beauty. I wish I still had it, but was young and needed to trade it for some cash at the time. It was a Martin of similar size and shape as the 000-17 12 fret, but was a 1970's model. I happen to like that size of guitar.

I was stating that Chris Martin found a way to make an American made product that is competitive with Pacific Rim imports such as Epiphone, Yamaha and Ibanez. Good for him. He's keeping his company in business and that's wonderful as far as I'm concerned. Especially since he's been a much better manager of this business than his father. From what I've read Martin was not doing at all well when Chris took the helm.

As a geezer, I am a little leary of using some modern technology on traditional instruments. I was not aware that Martin had been using Micarta for nuts. I suppose you just need a solid substance that will withstand cutting. You can look at it as another form of plastic I suppose. It is probably better than the PVC that some manufacturers are using as nut material.

You are right Roy in that I wouldn't purchase a guitar with a Micarta fingerboard. 'been there, done that. I have an Ovation Classical Electric in pristine condition from 1974. It sounds just like it did in 1974. I think I paid around $700 back then for it. Today it's worth about $500 with the OHSC. Part of owning a great guitar like Martin is the fact that these guitars appreciate in value over the years. They also appreciate in sound quality. Perhaps a guitar with a Corian or Micarta nut might not be too much of a factor in determining the value of a guitar years down the road. But I am afraid that a man-made fingerboard will ruin the guitars value in 10 or 15 years. The Lyrachord bowl certainly didn't help raise the value of my Ovation, regardless of the fact that the tuners are gold plated and the fingerboard is solid ebony.

My only point was just to discuss what others thought that the implications of using man-made materials had on high-end Martin guitars would be. It's obvious that someone has purchased one and likes what they have.

BTW has anyone checked the price of Rainsong guitars? They are very expensive.
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / So what's the deal with Martin?
MadMos

USA

all we are is dust in the wind...dude
Jan 6th, 2003 11:37 AM   Edit   Profile

I played a rainsong at a new guitar store that just opened around here. I was not impressed with it at all. Had a very bright tone and did not have the warmth of an all wood guitar. but it did seem indestructable. But they can keep it.
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / Finally got to try a couple of Rainsong acoustics...
Mikegilles

Southern California

Mike Gilles
Jan 10th, 2003 02:54 AM   Edit   Profile

I bought my WS-1000 in March of last year. I fly Citation and Lear Jets for a living and needed a guitar that could not only hold up to the rigors of daily travel, but to be able to withstand extremely cold temperatures. Most of the time, there is not enough room inside the cabin for my guitar so it has to be stowed in the outside baggage hold where the temperatures are regularly 40 to 50 degrees below zero for as long as five hours at a time. I spoke directly with RainSongís marketing and customer service honcho, who said they would stand behind their warrantee under those conditions. Iím told that the carbon graphite compound used in its construction is shipped to the factory in dry ice. I am here to tell you that the carbon graphite construction holds up so well that I donít even detune the instrument prior to loading and when I get to my hotel room, itís still in perfect tune. I am careful not to open the case until it reaches room temperature so that the condensation doesnít affect the electronics. I brought the guitar in to the Woodinville, Washington factory a couple of months ago where the marketing manager and Ashvin Coomar, the president and CEO, looked it over. They were very pleased to find that Ė after more than 50 flights -- the instrument looked showroom new with just a tiny scratch in the finish (which they promptly buffed out). I must warn you that heat is still the enemy of this guitar, and like any high-end guitar, you donít want to leave it in the trunk of your car on a hot summer day. The series 3 and 4 guitars are cured at a higher temperature and these are the preferred instruments. Also, the materials used in construction arenít bullet proof, so donít go using the guitar as a tennis racquet.
As far as playability is concerned, the set up from the factory is as good as those from Taylor, meaning they are comfortably low without any string buzz. My WS-1000 has the 1 ĺĒ nut width but the neck is thin enough that many electric guitar players find it comfortable. And what about the sound? I brought my RainSong to several open mic gatherings last year and many felt its sound was one of the best there. In Livermoore, California at the Fretted Friends event, everyone commented on how good it sounded when plugged in. It has the same on-board Fishman blender that Taylor uses with an under saddle pick up and inside microphone. In Valparaiso, Indiana at the Front Porch Music gathering, it was also very well received. One long time guitarist, who is a very accomplished player and owns a fleet of fine all-wood guitars said, ďI really didnít want to like this guitar.Ē It was hard to get it back from him so that I could take my turn at the mic.
A fine all-wood guitar is known for not only the sounds it projects, but for the sounds it absorbs. I own a Collings D-2H and D-1A for flat-picking along with my Martin HD-28, a Lowden F-32 for fingerstyle along with my Martin 000-28EC, and a Taylor 355 12-string, so I can appreciate the rich sound that those great guitars can make. When I play my all-wood guitars I hear warmth. When I play the RainSong I hear a slightly more bell-like tone where the highs shimmer. Thatís not to say they donít have any warmth! Iím talking subtleties here. When you think of the RainSong WS-1000, think of a piano. When you envision the jumbo JM 1000, think Grand Piano. I know of several artists who are more impressed with the plugged in sound than unplugged. I needed a guitar that could withstand extreme cold and could handle both the subtleties of fingerstyle and the demands of flatpicking. My WS-1000 not only does that but it has the playability and tone equal to many high-end instruments.
I donít work for RainSong, nor do they pay me for an endorsement, but I can highly recommend their instruments. I bought mine from a shop in Kentucky sight unseen. If you are interested in getting the deal I got, email me and Iíll be happy to refer you to a shop that will sell one for a $100 or more below anyone elseís price.
Regards,
Mike Gilles
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / I've Got GAS for an Ovation...which one?
Fr. Vivian O Blivion

Kelseytown, CT

My name is Michael. I've got a nickel.
Mar 22nd, 2003 06:55 AM   Edit   Profile

Well, ovations are rugged. I'll give them that.

I checked out a guitar which reminded me of an "Ovation on steriods," the Rainsong, which is a guitar entirely made of graphite composite. It feels more like a real acoustic. The neck is a little thin, front to back, but not bad. The tone is much better than any ovation I've played, but still within the same bright realm. Prices are kinda high, though.
Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / How Much Belly is Normal--Not Me, My Guitar!
heyday

USofA

Apr 12th, 2003 01:49 PM   Edit   Profile

Thumbpicker is right. A top needn't be perfectly flat, and in fact, it would probably be hard to achieve that with wood that is under all that string tension. Rainsong guitars might be a different story, though.

A guitar can "belly" too much, but when that happens, you'll generally know it and there is usually some structural failure behind it. Since your guitar is brand new, I wouldn't worry about this too much, but if you feel antsy about it, take it in and have a guitar tech inspect the top braces just to make sure nothing is cracked or there's some glue issue. Again, I doubt either of those is the case, because when you've got a cracked or loose brace, you generally know it.

If, however, the guitar develops a belly that's just too much (kinda like myself....) there are a couple of things that can be done about it. As I recall, Frank Ford discusses one of them (and it involves a lot of work by an experienced tech) at his website, the link to which is below.

Also, there's an outfit that produces a device known as the JLD Bridge Doctor that can be installed in a guitar to lessen bellying. The makers claim that not only does it do that, but it also enhances the sound of the guitar by transfering more of the top vibrations to the guitar's structure, or something like that. I think the thing is available through Steward Macdonald, among others.

Probably the World's Greatest Acoustic Guitar Site

Forum/Topic: FDP Unplugged - Acoustic Instruments / Rainsong guitars
johnny1111
Contributing Member
**

White Bear Lake, MN

May 10th, 2004 02:36 PM   Edit   Profile

I tried out the all graphite 6-string model a few weeks ago at a local music store. I was very impressed with the tone, action, intonation, and overall build quality. Well...maybe the guitar did sound just a "tiny" bit metallic. Other than that, however, the RainSong was damn near PERFECT.
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