FDP Forum / Sanding Sealer on Fretboard!/ 8 messages in thread.

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TonyMan

Contributing Member
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Lisle, IL USA

That's what she said!
Dec 18th, 2017 02:24 PM        

Well, I did it great this time. Got a neck that I am going to stain, prepped it, and then applied sanding sealer. Of course I didn't mask anything off because I just wanted to get it done. Turns out some of it got on the rosewood fretboard. When I looked at it today it looks kinda like a spot that has a light gloss finish. What would I use to take this off? I don't want guess and wind up making it worse.<br /> <br /> Thanks<br />



Peegoo

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Curled up

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Dec 18th, 2017 03:22 PM        

Try some acetone on a q-tip. Be stingy with the solvent (damp, not dripping) and don't be stingy with the q-tips. The idea is to carefully scrub the area with dampened cotton and have the cotton pick up the dissolved sealer.



Te 52



Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Dec 18th, 2017 03:31 PM        

I was also going to suggest acetone or lacquer thinner, but be careful, because the rosewood may have been dyed or stained to make it darker or to mitigate streakiness. <br /> <br /> Test on as small and as insignificant an area as possible before committing.



Mick Reid

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Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Dec 18th, 2017 03:58 PM        

Hi Tony. Late to the party but...<br /> <br /> I had a similar problem when I recently refinished a neck in Tru Oil. However I *did* mask off the fretboard but still had a couple of spots where the TO had weeped under the edge of the masking tape.<br /> <br /> I'll suggest eliminating the gloss will be the easy bit, but there may or may not be some discolouration where the sealer has gone into the grain.<br /> <br /> What I did was sanded the spots first with a 0000 synthetic pad to remove the surface layer and then rubbed them with turps and a rag on my finger repeatedly. (after reading Peegoo and Te 52's comments, I wonder if I should have sanded at all now)<br /> <br /> Unfortunately my efforts only minimised the visibility, not eliminate it.<br /> I ended up just living with it as it was project guitar for only myself. And TBH, I reckon 95% of anyone admiring the guitar from a metre away wouldn't notice it.<br /> <br /> I considered trying to stain the rosewood trying to match the darker spots or even thought about a light coat or two of Tru Oil, but thought I might end up chasing my tail so left it as best I could get it.<br /> <br /> I'll be interested in what others advise here cause I'll probably re-address the issue when that guitar inevitably ends up back on my bench.<br />



Peegoo

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Curled up

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Dec 18th, 2017 07:21 PM        

Another option is to carefully scrape the stuff off with a single-edge razor blade, and then lightly buff the area (with the grain) with 3-0 steel wool.<br /> <br /> 4-0 will make the wood too shiny



TonyMan

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Lisle, IL USA

That's what she said!
Dec 18th, 2017 07:59 PM        

Thanks for the advice all. I believe I have some acetone in the garage and will slowly give that a try. The razor blade sounds interesting, but I'd have to give that some more thought.



TonyMan

Contributing Member
*********

Lisle, IL USA

That's what she said!
Dec 18th, 2017 09:20 PM        

Turns out I didn't have acetone handy so I decided to try the razor. I went nice & slow and not too much pressure. It all came off real nice. <br /> <br /> Thanks for the advice.<br /> <br /> And yes, I am masking before I stain it. I thought I could quickly use the sealer last night without incident and learned the hard way. :-(<br />



Peegoo

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Curled up

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Dec 18th, 2017 09:29 PM        

"I went nice & slow and not too much pressure."<br /> <br /> NICE work! That is the [not really] *secret* to getting good results when working on guitars. It's like the "first do no harm" mantra that doctors go by. The Hippopotomatic Oath!<br /> <br /> Work slowly and carefully, and do no damage as you work, and you'll get consistently good results.



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