FDP Forum / Drilling Question/ 14 messages in thread.

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Malcolm

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Edmond, OK

Nov 16th, 2017 02:13 AM        

I've got an Epi ES-339 that I want to change p'ups out in. Also replacing the electronics.<br /> Buying a harness that requires the holes for the pots to be drilled , as they are bigger(full sized). <br /> <br /> Can this be done with a hand drill? Or, must I take it to someone?<br /> <br /> Realistically.



uncle stack-knob

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united kingdom

Nov 16th, 2017 02:43 AM        

Use a reamer and enlarge them by hand,far more control and safer for the guitar.



RicOkc



Nicoma Park, OK.

"Let the music do the talking"
Nov 16th, 2017 03:31 AM        

+1 on the hand reamer.



Peegoo

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Nov 16th, 2017 04:22 AM        

Yeah, because a typical drill bit can easily pop finish off or split the wood. A Uni-bit (step-drill) is a safe way to do this, however.<br /> <br /> If you don't have a reamer or a Uni-bit, you can use a Dremel and a little barrel burr or sanding drum to carefully embiggen the pot holes.



Peegoo

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Nov 16th, 2017 05:15 AM        

This is a



Leftee

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VA

Fear the Klinkhammer
Nov 16th, 2017 07:53 AM        

That’s some pretty unambiggalous advice right there.



wrnchbndr

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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Nov 16th, 2017 08:15 AM        

Darrel! ...go fetch my dickshunary.



ejm



usa

Nov 16th, 2017 08:44 AM        

I'll add to the drilling by hand conversation, but as related to changing tuning keys.<br /> <br /> You know the tiny screws used to hold the tuners on? Or the little holes needed for the guide/stability pins?<br /> <br /> I think it's called a pin vise. You put your drill bit in that, and then do the holes by hand. By not using/needing power tools, IMO this starts to move this task into the realm of a lot of our abilities.<br />



Peegoo

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Nov 16th, 2017 08:54 AM        

It embiggens a man to not find fault with others :o)



009

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USA

Nov 16th, 2017 09:18 AM        

"I think it's called a pin vise. You put your drill bit in that, and then do the holes by hand."<br /> <br /> Pin Vise: This interests me. Do you have any link at all to something like this? I'd like to investigate this further. I'm getting the impression that this is something that would help keep your drill bit perpendicular to a surface....<br /> <br /> I did not (as far as I can tell) see one of these on the Stewart-MacDonald web site (link below).



Peegoo

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Nov 16th, 2017 09:24 AM        

A pin vise looks sort of like a 4-jaw-chuck Exacto knife handle.<br /> <br /> Look up 'pin vise' in Google. Many tool makers offer 'em. Among the best quality is the Starrett brand.



009

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USA

Nov 16th, 2017 05:35 PM        

I would never have guessed what a “pin vise” is from its name alone.



Te 52



Laws of Physics

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Nov 16th, 2017 07:16 PM        

Ya, it would make more sense to call it a pin chuck or needle chuck, since it basically acts like a drill chuck that's been smallified.



Peegoo

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Nov 16th, 2017 07:40 PM        

It's actually used as a vise too: fly tiers, jewelry makers, watch makers, etc., use these to hold small items to work on them. The shaft (handle) mounts into a stand that holds it securely. <br /> <br /> Jewelers also have a different pin vise design that has moveable pins in small a flat work surface to clamp larger/irregular items like watch cases, etc.



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