FDP Forum / Got a question about maple sap.../ 18 messages in thread.

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Therealfrogman

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Pueblo, Co

illegal is a sick bird....
Oct 23rd, 2017 06:32 PM        

Or whatever you call it. What is it called? Its the red coloring that you sometimes see on maple necks.



wrnchbndr

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Oct 24th, 2017 10:25 AM        

The ambered lacquer?



littleuch

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Oct 24th, 2017 10:33 AM        

I'm craving pancakes.



Te 52



Laws of Physics

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Oct 24th, 2017 10:34 AM        

Are you talking about an even color or localized spots/streaks?



wrnchbndr

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Oct 24th, 2017 11:06 AM        

Don't know if I'm addressing your question or not. Way back in the way back, clear lacquers and other finishes were a lot more sensitive to UV exposure and they would darken from exposure to sunlight. Wood also darkens from UV exposure. A brand new telecaster in 1960 looked just like a brand new one today with the maple neck being quite light in color. Over the years these the lacquer darkened going from clear to a dirty orangish yellow or amber. Additionally, many guitars sat out in the open and became covered with nicotine and other pollutants in the air. In the 1970s the formulas for lacquer and other finishes were improved for the ability to resist this darkening of clear finish, their durability, and ease of application. Guitar manufacturers generally follow the automotive industry for the paints and finishes. Over time, the finishes have evolved many times and now environmental impact and air pollution is a large concern. There are finishes now that will last 100 years without a change in color.<br /> <br /> Some people want their guitar to look like new forever. Other people like the look of aged maple simply because it looks warmer. And then there are people who want their new guitar to look as though its actually an old guitar.<br /> <br /> There is no real defined color for true aged lacquer. Even during the 50s and 60s the formula for clear lacquer changed over and over. Some 50 year old guitars have a mild yellowing and others are nearly an orange but they were all crystal clear to begin with. Manufacturers try to imitate this aged look and sometimes try too hard or go too far and the color of the maple necks just don't look natural but its all a matter of personal taste.<br /> <br /> The maple used for guitar necks is quite dry from a controlled drying process before the necks are shaped. There is no remaining free sap and moisture content is usually somewhere around 10%.



Peegoo

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Oct 24th, 2017 11:08 AM        

Generally, darker streaks in any wood grain indicate softer sections of wood. Some maples have reddish streaks, sometimes they're greenish or brown. <br /> <br /> Colored streaks can sometimes be due to spalting--which is a discoloration caused by fungus in the wood. The fungus dies off as part of the seasoning (drying) process, so there's no need for concern that microbial termites are eating up your Telecaster's neck :o)



wrnchbndr

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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Oct 24th, 2017 11:18 AM        

You might also be referring to flame or tiger stripes in maple which are just cool types of patterns in certain cut planks. Its totally unpredictable when cutting down a maple tree but when its found, the wood is a lot more desirable and sold at a premium price. The more intense the flame the higher the price.<br /> <br /> You can also find many instances of faux flame wood in guitars from the 60s and early 70s. Harmony guitars did this a lot. The flame is totally fake and just painted tints.



Therealfrogman

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Pueblo, Co

illegal is a sick bird....
Oct 24th, 2017 11:29 AM        

Here it is.



Peegoo

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Oct 24th, 2017 11:48 AM        

Looks like a simple mineral stain in the wood. This is a product of the specific soil content where the tree was grown.<br /> <br /> It is nothing to be concerned about, and I think it adds beauty to the guitar. Wood grain is identical to a human fingerprint.<br /> <br /> There is no other guitar in the universe that looks like yours does.



twangdoodles



michigan usa

Oct 25th, 2017 06:09 AM        

Those look like natural pin-stripes.



Peegoo

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Oct 25th, 2017 07:44 AM        

Looks to me like an abstract fish swimming through the water



Peegoo

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Oct 25th, 2017 08:10 AM        

I have something similar that I built a few years back, but



Therealfrogman

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Pueblo, Co

illegal is a sick bird....
Oct 26th, 2017 12:05 PM        

Peegoo, you are very optimistic about things, I want to sell the guitar to fund another one but buyers seem picky about this kind of thing.<br /> <br />



Peegoo

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Oct 26th, 2017 12:11 PM        

These sorts of stains in the wood are *in* the wood--not on the wood. This means you could sand off any amount of finish and wood, and you'd still be chasing the stain down into the wood.<br /> <br /> Advise any interested buyer that it's not a problem. <br /> <br /> They want proof, you say? <br /> <br /> Hold the guitar so you can see the image of a bright overhead light reflected in the lacquer on the fingerboard. If the finish is nice and smooth across the transition between the lighter and darker sections of wood, that means the wood is stable and sound, and nothing is deteriorating.



Mick Reid

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Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Oct 26th, 2017 04:08 PM        

"Looks to me like an abstract fish swimming through the water."<br /> <br /> "...but buyers seem picky about this kind of thing."<br /> <br /> Find someone that's in a Christian Rock band and tell them it's the "Jesus Fish" like the Mother Mary that miraculously appears on toast from time to time!<br /> <br /> You'd probably get double your money.<br />



Peegoo

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Oct 26th, 2017 08:24 PM        

Heyyyy bonzer idea. You Aussies are a crafty bunch!



Mick Reid

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Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Oct 26th, 2017 09:40 PM        

"You Aussies are a crafty bunch!"<br /> <br /> That's because I'm a hybrid!<br /> <br /> Ol' New England Yankee + Aussie!!!



Te 52



Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Oct 26th, 2017 10:06 PM        

Yep, mineral streaks. Very common, particularly in maple and birch. <br /> <br /> They're controversial among furniture and cabinet makers; some hate them and cut around them or attempt to bleach them, others think they add interest to the piece and leave them in.<br /> <br /> I have a maple-bodied Ric bass that has a curvy one on its face, although most of it is covered by the pickguard.



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