FDP Forum / Painting over an existing finish/ 7 messages in thread.

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Rick Knight

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St Peters, MO USA

Standing in the back, by the drummer.
Sep 1st, 2017 01:43 PM        

Would changing a clear finish to Butterscotch Blonde be as simple as a bit of fine sandpaper and a can or two of ReRanch, or is there more to it than that?



Peegoo

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Sep 1st, 2017 02:36 PM        

It's doable, but there are some considerations:<br /> <br /> -If the existing finish is nitro, yes...and<br /> <br /> -Butterscotch blonde is a translucent (partially opaque) finish. These can be tricky. <br /> <br /> Laying on the coats is an art, because you want to see some of the wood grain through the finish. if you lay it on too thick, if becomes completely opaque and you lose the wood grain. <br /> <br /> And if you wet-sand too heavily, you remove too much finish. <br /> <br /> It can all result in a blotchy appearance.<br /> <br /> So the best approach is to do multiple *super light* coats of the butterscotch until you achieve the translucency you want with no blotchiness.<br /> <br /> Follow that with 6-8 coats of clear before you let it rest, and then start your wet sanding, with light clear coats between. <br /> <br /> That way you are leveling clear finish, not the translucent finish. It preserves the look you're going for.<br /> <br />



Rick Knight

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St Peters, MO USA

Standing in the back, by the drummer.
Sep 1st, 2017 03:06 PM        

Thanks, Peegoo. I appreciate the information. Patience, delicacy and moderation are not commonly attributed to me. This might be too advanced for my first attempt at refinishing.



Standard24



San Antonio, Texas

Sep 1st, 2017 03:22 PM        

Here's an example of a crappy cover-up job, over vintage white. this was a very quick job with spray paint from Walmart.<br /> <br />



Peegoo

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Sep 1st, 2017 06:44 PM        

That looks GREAT, Standard24!



Peegoo

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Sep 1st, 2017 06:56 PM        

Rick, even if you're not super experienced with this stuff, you can get great results.<br /> <br /> There are a few "must do's" when using spray equipment or aerosol spray paint:<br /> <br /> Prep is *everything*. A smooth, clean surface helps guarantee a smooth, perfect finish.<br /> <br /> Make sure it's mixed well (shake shake shake); then when it's all shook up, shake it for another two minutes.<br /> <br /> Spray when the humidity is low and the temperature is between 60 and 80 degrees F. If the paint is cold, set it in a bucket of warm water.<br /> <br /> Use a jig or "dummy neck" (e.g., 24" section of broomstick, etc.) to use as a handle when applying the spray finish.<br /> <br /> Keep the spray head between 6" and 10" from the work.<br /> <br /> Spray the guitar body while it's hanging vertically. Spray horizontally, and you risk dropping a blob of paint on the work (just like what happens at 1:40 in the linked vid, which is a pretty good overview).<br /> <br /> Start and stop each spray pass off the work. This prevents spits and spats of color on the work.<br /> <br /> Several light coats are better than fewer heavy coats.



Rick Knight

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St Peters, MO USA

Standing in the back, by the drummer.
Sep 2nd, 2017 06:04 AM        

"That looks GREAT, Standard24!"<br /> <br /> +1



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