FDP Forum / Problem on a Mustang/ 13 messages in thread.

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wrnchbndr

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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Jun 26th, 2017 06:51 PM        

This is a fairly new Crafted in Japan. Its all set up and plays really well. The problem is with the trem. It does not return to a constant place. The instability is almost a full semitone. Gently flat the strings with the whammy bar and let it gently rise on its own and the pitch remains flat. Gently sharp the strings and gently let it return and the strings stay sharp. You can see that it does not return to a common location. The bridge rocks freely and is elevated in the cups as it should be.<br /> <br /> The adjustable tail screw pivot bolts are clean but the base plate holes that the pivot bolts rock within looked poorly finished. I cleaned up the holes and greased them but it didn't help.<br /> <br /> Is there hope for this type of trem? Is there an Fender American made part that might be superior?



wrnchbndr

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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Jun 27th, 2017 09:21 AM        

I spoke to a really decent guy at Fender. He looked up the trem and the same trem is used on all Mustangs regardless of where they are made. It might be that I just have a defective part.



Cal-Woody



USA/California

Why do I keep fixing things that work?
Jun 27th, 2017 09:53 AM        

It almost sounds like a sticky nut problem but there have been a few conversations here concerning the setup and adjustments to this unit and I had hoped someone here had already directed you to that article by now!<br /> It may have been in the Squier forum talking about the J.Macias models, but do believe the content to be relevant.<br /> I have nothing to compare notes with you for your dilemma, but I think a search on here had some reference to their resolve and some YouTube 'how to' videos. <br /> Best regards, as always- Woody



Peegoo

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Jun 27th, 2017 12:16 PM        

Is the bridge (not the tailpiece) properly rocking in its little steel cups? Each end of the bridge has a hole that accepts a hex wrnch that fits a grub screw. The grub screw has a little point on it and that allows the bridge to rock just a bit.



Peegoo

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Jun 27th, 2017 12:19 PM        

Also, is the tailpiece properly strung? The strings run backwards through the bar, then under the bar and up over the bridge saddles.<br />



wrnchbndr

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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Jun 27th, 2017 02:15 PM        

If it were the nut, the pitch would be reversed. Flatten via the whammy bar, release, and the pitch would be sharp instead of flat -- pull up on the whammy bar, release and the pitch would be flat. It's not the nut. The cups and the height screws are correct - the bridge pivots with no restriction. It clearly is the trem unit. Unfortunately, you can't see the springs in action or the underside of the trem with this style of trem.



Peegoo

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Jun 27th, 2017 02:24 PM        

Add a drop of machine oil to the places where the springs anchor (the two posts and the bridge plate) and see if that helps.



Hammond101

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So. Cal. USA

Jun 27th, 2017 04:47 PM        

It is a bridge pivot issue....somewhere. These seem to either work or not work. Odd tailpiece to begin with. I've had a couple I just replaced. They are about $30.



Te 52



Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Jun 28th, 2017 04:18 PM        

Could it be a warpage issue? I know for sure that on a Bigsby, if the frame is twisted or warped such that the two borings for the arm bearings are not perfectly co-axial, it will introduce enough friction into the arm motion that the system will not reliably return to pitch.<br /> <br /> Again on a Bigsby, it's easy enough to test: With the unit off the guitar, hold it up with the arm hanging down, pull the arm to one side and release it. If the arm does not swing like a pendulum through several cycles, the unit is suspect.<br /> <br /> I'm not familiar with the Mustang trem, but I wonder if some similar test could be devised?



Peegoo

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Jun 28th, 2017 06:05 PM        

It's a steel plate with two holes that have a knife edge, supporting two studs with V grooves. A much simpler design than the Strat's vibrato bridge. <br /> <br /> It works just like a Floyd, except upside down: instead of the two studs remaining stationary and the plate pivoting on the studs, the studs extend downward from the string anchor bar and pivot against a stationary plate.



Te 52



Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Jun 30th, 2017 11:51 AM        

Having studied up on the design a little more, I now doubt that warpage is an issue. The link goes to the patent on the design. If you click on the second small thumbnail, you get a pretty good cross-sectional view.<br /> <br /> I think it's a problematic design from a friction point of view, not as good as the Strat trem. <br /> <br /> The only specific advice I can offer (other than checking for any place that could be rubbing and greasing the heck out of all contact points) is to make sure that the two descending posts for the pivot are very close to perpendicular to the plate when strung up to pitch. This may require moving the springs to a different groove on the pivot posts, depending on the string gauge used.



amphead4



Cincinnati, USA

Jun 30th, 2017 01:24 PM        

With the springs in a V configuration, there would be a slight rotation around the posts (hooks) as they move. So each end would be need to be snag-free with that respect. Not sure if that's enough to cause the problem though.



Peegoo

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Jun 30th, 2017 02:31 PM        

I always lube the spring ends on my '66 Mustang...as well as the pivot points.



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