FDP Forum / A friend turned me on to Katana fret leveling and Little Bone fret dresser./ 6 messages in thread.

1 to 6 of 6 shown.


hotblooze



World Traveler

Wood, magnetic coil and strings.
Jun 8th, 2017 09:23 PM        

Anyone used them and any comments ?



vomer

Contributing Member
**********

Broke Down

in the Brassicas
Jun 9th, 2017 03:32 AM        

Interesting idea to be able to level the frets while the guitar is under string tension. But only if you want the frets level i.e. all flat while you are playing, and you may not. I don't set guitars up with the frets level like this. <br /> <br /> Two things; first, what happens to the frets if you want to introduce relief may not be equal along the board and your levelling may have to take this into account.<br /> <br /> Second, one of my favourite things to do to enhance playabilty and enable big bends without fretting out is to introduce some 'fall-away' in the upper frets, where the fret level drops off slightly towards the bridge. Usually from around the 13th fret or so but each guitar will vary.<br /> <br /> All stuff I've learned here from my betters. <br /> <br /> Edit to add: he holds his strings back with masking tape which I used to do but sometimes ended up having to get sticky goo off the strings later. I use a bent piece of thick wire wrapped in cloth to protect the back of the neck. <br /> <br /> And the little crowning file looks like it could be useful if it's not expensive. I bought one of the Stewmac double sided diamond files ages ago but they're expensive now, especially with the exchange rate.<br /> <br /> Edit as I put my previous edit in the middle of the text, mangling the meaning.



DrKev

Contributing Member
*****

Paris, France

It's just a guitar, not rocket science.
Jun 9th, 2017 04:54 AM        

"Interesting idea to be able to level the frets while the guitar is under string tension. But only if you want the frets level i.e. all flat while you are playing, and you may not."<br /> <br /> Not sure about that. With the three little brass pyramids, the sanding bar is first adjusted to match the curve of the fingerboard, so in principle the frets should follow the fretboard as they would if you did this any other way. This does of course assume a simple consistent curve (which it may or may not be) and that the brass pyramids are accurately machined to the exact same dimensions as each other and undamaged in any way.



twangdoodles



michigan usa

Jun 9th, 2017 06:11 AM        

Yet another way to do this. <br /> <br /> I'm sure you can get fine results that way but it would be really annoying sanding that way if you had to remove any divots. Also, dealing with the strings that way in general would annoy me.<br /> <br /> I have no idea what he was saying but I suspect that the idea is that tailoring the sanding bar to the bend of the neck is supposed to somehow be more accurate. <br /> <br /> I'll stick with my more traditional methods, haven't had any problems yet...



vomer

Contributing Member
**********

Broke Down

in the Brassicas
Jun 9th, 2017 12:22 PM        

DrKev, yes, sorry, of course. I'd noticed this on the video but disengaged brain before posting, I think I was too hooked by the thought of losing the ability to make local changes and fall-away. But as you say, anything but a constant curve wouldn't work unless you only moved the bar a short distance. <br /> <br /> And the whole idea seems one step removed from having control over each aspect of the job.



FunkyKikuchiyo



VT

Jun 9th, 2017 07:51 PM        

My thoughts:<br /> <br /> I haven't used it, but I like that it seems to be a cheaper and easier tool in the same vein as a Plek or the Stew Mac neck jig: all three are designed to mimick string tension for a fret leveling. <br /> <br /> That said, I think that is often a solution seeking a problem. Leveling the frets without string tension is perfectly fine, and my maple block does a mighty fine fret leveling. Stuff comes out great and I only remove what I have to. Sometimes necks do wonky things under tension that you don't detect without tension, but very often you can still address those issues without any of these tools. For example, an off center truss rod (or otherwise odd neck construction) can cause a neck to turn as it has tension causing a twist that won't be present with no tension. If one is observant and crafty you can deal with this with a flat block... sand the frets differently on the bass side and treble side with different truss rod adjustments, and you've deal with it, wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am.<br /> <br /> If I were to procure one, it would be a special tool that I'd break out for certain circumstances, or use it as finishing passes after a leveling with no tension.<br /> <br /> YMMV



Copyright 1999-2003 Fender Discussion Page, LLC. Visit the web site at http://www.fenderforum.com