FDP Forum / Recording the band live....../ 4 messages in thread.

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greg1948

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Vero Beach FL

Mar 27th, 2016 06:08 AM        

I have recorded practices with a little Zoom digital recorder, but I want to do better. I have a Tascam 2 channel interface for my Macbook with Logic Express. I have analog mixers that can handle up to 12 inputs. I can use one of the mixers just for vocals.<br /> <br /> We have two guitars, keyboard, drums and two vocal mics. No isolation of instruments. I can take direct feeds from PA and amplifiers into the mixer.<br /> <br /> I'll have to record everything live and since it will be already "mixed down" going into the computer, there won't be any overdubbing. "Quick and dirty."<br /> <br /> Assuming I'll have enough mics, how would you guys set up for this kind of recording.



Juice Nichols

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Panama City, FL

Same ol **** but my hair's longer
Mar 27th, 2016 06:23 AM        

I bought a Behringer XR18 to do this type of stuff. I can multitrack 18 tracks straight to my computer. <br /> <br /> In your situation, since you only have the ability to have 2 inputs to your computer, just mix it down to a stereo feed and run it into your interface. Without knowing the make and model of your mixer it is difficult to know the exact routing involved but you'll need a stereo line level signal for your interface.



Peegoo

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Eat. Sleep. Guitar.

Repeat
Mar 27th, 2016 07:27 AM        

Recording a room can be hard because placing mics around the room and on instruments and setting levels creates an artificial-sounding environment (to my ears, at least).<br /> <br /> One way I've discovered to record a room and end up with a realistic sound is to use a pair of PZMs (boundary mics). <br /> <br /> Even my inexpensive Crown PZMs do an amazing job of recording--whether it's a full band chugging at gig volume, or an acoustic guitar in a living room.<br /> <br /> The trick is to place them on a wall or floor, about 24" apart. I tape the paddle portion to a wall at head height, using gaff tape. Head height is important.<br /> <br /> Placing them in the middle of the room defeats their intended use because you end up with the same phase cancellation you get with standard mics. <br /> <br /> They also cut back on perceived reverb in a room, and that makes for a really clean/clear recording.<br /> <br /> As inexpensive as these are, they are mind blowing in their ability to capture a room sound. The recordings sound like you're in the room as the music is being played.



Peegoo

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Eat. Sleep. Guitar.

Repeat
Mar 27th, 2016 07:37 AM        

If you do try a pair of those Crowns, be sure to remove the battery when the mic is not being used. There's no on/off switch on the mic, and they can't be phantom powered. <br /> <br /> If you leave the battery in, it will drain to zero volts in two or three days.



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