FDP Forum / single coil Fender pup output question and comment/ 5 messages in thread.

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Tony F



Long Island, NY

When you come to fork in road take it
Dec 23rd, 2015 02:33 PM        

I have a MIM tele with two custom shop pups, a 69 strat in the neck and nocaster in the bridge. These pups are refined very vintage sounding a bit low in output and a lot of sparkle. I just picked up a 60's classic vibe Neil Simon Strat with the alnico3 and 5 mixed magnets in each pup. Here's my question they sound hot and fat they sound awesome but there so loud I can't switch guitars without tweaking the amp. I had all kinds of pups but never this hot I thought all vintage type pups would be more or less on the low output side as the originals were.<br /> thanks for reading this long post.



Peegoo

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Chain Smokin'

Gas Station Attendant
Dec 23rd, 2015 02:50 PM        

I don't know what your question is, but I think it's "aren't all 'vintage' pickups lower output?"<br /> <br /> Generally--yes. But even some of the real-deal old ones (and many modern production "remakes" of the old ones) are hot.<br /> <br /> The concept of overwound pickups started with Dimarzio and Duncan in the late 60s-early 70s.



ejm



usa

Dec 24th, 2015 07:55 AM        

I'll twist around what Peegoo thinks your question is.<br /> <br /> "I don't know what your question is, but I think it's "aren't all 'vintage' pickups lower output AND roughly the same output?"<br /> <br /> Are they all "lower" output? First of all, define "lower". <br /> <br /> Then, are they roughly the same output? No.<br /> <br /> Case in point: I know someone with two old Strats. They are both probably within a year of each other, 63 or 64. We noticed over time that they both obviously do not have the same output levels. It is very noticeable. <br /> <br /> We measured the pickup resistances and sure enough they are not the same. I did some internet research on this, and stumbled across a web site for Strat pickup resistances.<br /> <br /> Guess what? Not only did the web site show the same thing, but the resistances on the site were almost dead on what we measured. So we weren't imagining things. By the way, the one with the lower resistances has the lower output.<br /> <br /> Footnote: Yes, I know that resistances are not the be all and end all for determining output. But for lack of any other information it's probably a good indicator.<br /> <br /> Now, keep in mind also that you are not dealing with true vintage pickups. What you have are pickups that over God knows how many years and how many "expert designers" have come to be tweaked/altered/etc and have a label put on them leading you to believe that they are some vintage spec pickup.<br /> <br /> My advice: If you like both guitars, but they happen to be "different", then embrace the differences for what they are and play them both as the situation dictates.<br />



Peegoo

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Chain Smokin'

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Dec 24th, 2015 08:01 AM        

That is true: the resistance is a reference only. Inductance, capacitance, magnet type, and materials all contribute to the tone of a pickup.



Tony F



Long Island, NY

When you come to fork in road take it
Dec 28th, 2015 03:38 PM        

Thanks guys. I just had it my head if you are marketing a pup as a replica of a vintage fender it wouldnt be so hot as lack highs and be very thick sounding . I associate that fat sounding single coil with lack of sparkle with overwinding. I managed a music store in the 70's with one of the largest Fender inventories in the NYC area 60's and 70's stock and those strats and tele's did not sound like these current so called vintage pups imo that said I'm cool and still love the tone as a thick strat tone is very cool like a mini P90 :-). Just an observation more than a complaint.



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