FDP Forum / Song Intro's Long or Shrot/ 10 messages in thread.

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LeftRightOut

Contributing Member
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Australia

too many guitars and not enough hands
Feb 17th, 2014 04:44 PM        

What's your take,<br /> <br /> before the lyrics do you like to let the music breath or start with the lyrcs after a couple of bars?<br /> <br /> I know it depends on the song but most songwriters follow a pattern and just curious<br /> <br /> I like longer intro not epic like pink Floyd eg crazy diamond.<br /> <br /> but at least a good 8 or 12 bars



littleuch

Contributing Member
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Ocala, Fla

Feb 17th, 2014 05:14 PM        

More often than not I'll go 8 bars or so, but I have a couple that come right out of the box with vocal on beat one.



gdw3



LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Feb 18th, 2014 02:40 PM        

+1 littleuch



tiller2

Contributing Member
*******

Washington DC

Jun 16th, 2014 09:48 AM        

Just long enuf to get my strum hand going at the right speed ;^)



ninworks



USA

Too Much GAS
Jun 16th, 2014 09:51 AM        

For me, it's all about where I want the song to go. It also depends upon the style. If it's a commercial or pop song then a short intro is needed. For anything else it depends upon whatever I can come up with that I like.



DrKev

Contributing Member
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Irishman in Paris

Forget Tone - go with Note Choice
Dec 26th, 2014 05:01 AM        

Think of the "30 second rule" - if vocals don't start within 30 seconds the music must be doing something useful and/or interesting for the average non-musician listener, otherwise you are needlessly keeping people waiting. Personally I think 30 seconds is usually too long, I tend to go with 15 or 20 seconds. Sometimes even zero seconds is the way to go.<br /> <br /> Every single bar of music must have a purpose and add to the listener's experience. If it doesn't serve any purpose or doesn't need to be there and the song lacks nothing if it's not there, you should consider cutting it.



Slimlefttown



Canada

Dec 26th, 2014 03:56 PM        

There is an old school saying as follows:<br /> "Don't be a schnook, get to the hook "<br /> Take that for what it's worth.<br /> I would say that statement was directed at songs meant for the commercial market place.<br /> If you're doing artsy fartsy then I imagine that statement would not apply.<br /> Slim



5Strats

Contributing Member
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Edmond/OKC

AXE VICTIM
Jan 6th, 2015 12:13 PM        

One of my band's songs starts with an unaccompanied guitar intro followed by a brief full band intro. It's not a pop song and isn't a short song either.<br /> <br /> We have another song that starts with the chorus and has no intro.<br /> <br /> There are no hard and fast rules in music IMHO!



Slimlefttown



Canada

Jan 10th, 2015 08:13 PM        

5Strats. I disagree. There are hard and fast rules in music and they are rarely successfully broken.<br /> Of course if you're independent and don't give a damn about what statistically is popular and what statistically sells then you can do what ever the heck you want.



5Strats

Contributing Member
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Edmond/OKC

AXE VICTIM
Jan 30th, 2015 10:00 AM        

Using that logic Queen should never have released "Bohemian Rhapsody" because it didn't follow the pop song rules.<br /> <br /> Same goes for Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" and numerous other famous songs.<br /> <br /> "what statistically sells"? What does this have to do with art, music and creativity?



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