FDP Forum / Raised "A" pole pieces/ 10 messages in thread.

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JackL

Contributing Member
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Chico CA

just happy to be here!
Mar 27th, 2010 08:02 AM        

Hey All,<br /> <br /> After following the thread on Uncle Stack-Knob's new "Grandpa's 57", and noticing George's post on pushing down the magnets (at least that's what I thought he was referring to), I realized I don't know why some basses had the raised poles pieces.<br /> <br /> Some enlightenment please!<br /> <br /> Jack



jobsworth

Contributing Member
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Asheville NC

Mar 27th, 2010 01:54 PM        

My understanding is that the early split pickup P basses in the later 50's had raised poles on the A string; this was to compensate for the relatively weak amps of the time - dedicated bass amps / cabinets were still years out in real terms. Bass players of the time complained about their weak sounding A strings.<br /> <br /> Playing a raised A pickup with a normal P bass pickup setting nowadays will give too much volume boost to that string so the usual way to compensate is to angle that pickup down on one side so that top of the raised A string pole is level with the others. <br /> <br /> This design was also used on the 1980's Fullerton P reissues as they were supposed to be close to original specs.



edmonstg

Contributing Member
*******

Newberg, Oregon

Fender...never say never.
Mar 27th, 2010 05:35 PM        

Bass speakers in the 1950s were nothing like they are today and so the raised-A design pumped the mid-range on Precision basses to lessen the load of E-strings on the speakers.<br /> <br /> It was a compensation thing.<br /> <br /> George



Pocket



USA

Mar 27th, 2010 08:39 PM        

To throw another theory into the mix: I've read/heard somewhere that the raised A poles came about to compensate for electric bass string inconsistencies at the time(?) The speaker theory makes more sense IMO...



rwb

Contributing Member
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Canada

The Plankster of Love
Mar 27th, 2010 10:33 PM        

My AV series 57 had the raised A and it drove me nuts, I finally ditched the pup and stuck a Duncan Antiquity in there....<br /> <br />



edmonstg

Contributing Member
*******

Newberg, Oregon

Fender...never say never.
Mar 28th, 2010 03:43 AM        

"Well why would they put them on my new custom bass?"<br /> <br /> To give engineers something to do?<br /> <br /> "...I finally ditched the pup and stuck a Duncan Antiquity..."<br /> <br /> I hoped you saved the originals.<br /> <br /> George<br /> <br /> <br />



rwb

Contributing Member
***

Canada

The Plankster of Love
Mar 28th, 2010 11:17 AM        

Oh yes of course I did George. And in typical style, I am currently wondering if I was too hasty and should slap them in and revisit them.... I never really did a true comparison, the Duncans do the job bit occasionally I find them a bit mid rangy possibly. Could just be me being whiny too LOL. Anyone else have a comparison on Antiquity P-bass pups, particularily in regard to an old school flat wound type of P-bass sound?



edmonstg

Contributing Member
*******

Newberg, Oregon

Fender...never say never.
Mar 28th, 2010 01:07 PM        

I like the direction of your thinking, Love Plankster. Give 'um another try. I personally dig the sound of raised-A and have never had a problem dialing them in.<br /> <br /> George



jobsworth

Contributing Member
*

Asheville NC

Mar 28th, 2010 02:43 PM        

The raised A's on my Fullerton P are more middy than the 62 RI USA pickups (and the Antiquity II's I replaced them with). I gather this too is similar to the originals. I personally really like these raised A pickups and dialing them in only takes a few moments. One of Fender's better P bass pickups IMO.



edmonstg

Contributing Member
*******

Newberg, Oregon

Fender...never say never.
Mar 28th, 2010 04:57 PM        

I've always thought Fender pickups were noted for giving some of the sweetest midrange on the planet.<br /> <br /> George



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