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FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Could this be done, and how would you do it?

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
May 26th, 2019 03:41 AM   Edit   Profile  

I'm just kind of thinking out loud here but, could a standard strat/tele body & neck be constructed as a set neck?

I've got a couple of ideas on joining the heel & pocket other than just splooging some glue in there, but I'll put it to the FDP Brains Trust for more.

I'm not worried about the gap that is normally present with a typical bolt-on assembly as I would fill it and paint the whole thing a solid colour (bar the fretboard).

As I said, I'm just tossing around possible ideas for my next project after I complete the hardtail build currently underway.

Any thoughts from you all? (other than "Why would you?")


Gaukdawg

Ohio

Say what one more time!
May 26th, 2019 08:08 AM   Edit   Profile  

First thought would be to drill out the screw holes and use dowels with a press fit. I think glue and the dowel rods would be a strong enough bond.

Cal-Woody

USA/California

Why do I keep fixing things that work?
May 26th, 2019 08:36 AM   Edit   Profile  

There are plenty of set neck Teles out there and Gaukdog presents a good method of creating a solid bond with the pressed in dowels and glue.
With his method, you could also taper the heel of the body because the dowels can be sanded down, along with the body to contour the shape toward the neck joint, thus giving you a nice transition to the neck, like an SG style guitar.
Would like to do a Tele with a set neck with either P-90's or some TV Jones pickups. That would be a powerful beast!!! Metallic orange with a white and black paisley colored pickguard.
So many thoughts come to mind on the finish material but Yes, this idea will work quite well.
Best regards, Woody

wrnchbndr
Contributing Member
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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
May 26th, 2019 11:38 AM   Edit   Profile  

The area of just the bottom of the neck pocket is enough to establish a glue joint strong enough to deal with the stress as long as it is prepared properly and clamped properly but I wouldn't leave it in a hot car on a sunny summer day. I've done a few set neck guitars that are nothing more than a well fit Fender-style heel and pocket. Its far more area contact than an Epiphone SG. If you employed some craftsmanship with a nice tight fit with bare wood, it would be fine.

PARAGRAPH AND RANT ABOUT WHY WOULD YOU DO THIS NOT INCLUDED BY REQUEST OF THE ORIGINATOR OF THIS POST.

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

May 26th, 2019 02:20 PM   Edit   Profile  

I hope its not a heel adjust truss rod 😂

I keed, I keed.

That sounds like something I would do.

"Unclamps neck. Man, that came out real nice. Good glue join. Now to put strings on and do a setup.

Hmmmm. Neck has too much relief. Let me put a crank on the - oh dammit."

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
May 26th, 2019 05:04 PM   Edit   Profile  

Thanks for the ideas guys. Quite similar to my own but hadn't thought of using dowels, and yes, it would be a headstock adjust truss rod Aaron! ;^)

"PARAGRAPH AND RANT ABOUT WHY WOULD YOU DO THIS NOT INCLUDED BY REQUEST OF THE ORIGINATOR OF THIS POST."

Thanks for NOT asking wrnch. To answer the question you *didn't* ask:

Just for something a little different / low impulse control / because I can (maybe?) / I'll need something to do at some point / idle hands and all that...

At this stage it's purely an idea. Whether it proves to be a good or bad one, still remains.


wrnchbndr
Contributing Member
**********
**

New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
May 27th, 2019 01:06 PM   Edit   Profile  

Just takin' the mick... I've posted lots of things that I knew would result in indignant speeches without actually getting my question answered or constructive assistance.

More:
Tone happens man. Guitars are a great place to exercise low impulse control because no one gets hurt. With a few wood chisels and a decent router template, its not a big deal to remove a glued-in neck and toss the remains into a fireplace as an offering to the guitar gods. ;^)

In the way back, I stressed a lot over building set neck guitars. I've built six LP Jrs and their neck joints are nothing more than a snug bolt-on style pocket with glue instead of screws. It doesn't take a complicated joint to yield the strength required. You certainly have the chops to pull this off.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 27th, 2019 01:32 PM   Edit   Profile  

An interesting and informative side note to this thread is a comparison of how a Fender neck mates with the body, and how makers of set-neck guitars like Gibson and PRS do it, because they are two opposing philosophies. And they both work great.

Fender relies on the neck being drawn into the neck pocket and resting tight and flush with the floor of the pocket (and any shim material). The sides of the pocket are a relatively loose fit, which is an intentional part of the design. Since Fender's method uses modular construction and guitar bodies and necks are made of wood, there needs to be just a smidge of wiggle room for three reasons: (1) wood can expand or contract after being machined and finished, (2) align the neck with the bridge, and (3) prevent the wood/finish from cracking in the neck pocket's side in the treble cutaway from excessive side pressure.

Gibson and PRS are 180 degrees out from Fender. They rely on a very snug fit of the neck side to side, and need wiggle room on the floor of the neck pocket. This allows them to apply a neck angle gauge to the tops of the frets and ensure the height of the line extending from the frets' tops is correct over the bridge area. This gauge is applied when the technician glues in the neck and ensures consistent neck angles. There is usually a small air gap between the bottom of the neck's tenon and the floor of the neck pocket. The other critical setting, besides neck angle, is that the neck is tight against the end of the neck pocket at the neck's heel.

Ovation did a combination of these two methods for several years on their electrics (Viper, Preacher, Breadwinner, and Deacon). They used screws and glue. Made for a very solid neck connection. I've never seen an Ovation electric with a neck broken away from the body. I'm sure it's happened tho.

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 03:34 PM, May 27th, 2019)

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
May 27th, 2019 04:10 PM   Edit   Profile  

"An interesting and informative side note to this thread..."

Yes, that was. Thanks.

"In the way back, I stressed a lot over building set neck guitars."

I've only done one so far. It came out great but it wasn't without double-quadruple measuring before the final turn on the clamp!

"You certainly have the chops to pull this off."

Thanks :^)
(and I knew you were only joking before!)


Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 29th, 2019 05:05 PM   Edit   Profile  

In the 90 and 2000s Fender issued several set-neck and through-neck guitars with the Squier label, made under contract on the ROK.

These were extremely high-quality guitars and brand new they sold for peanuts ($300 or so). It's no wonder you don't see these come up for sale very often; the players that have them tend to hang onto them.

Here's an Esquire GT. Great guitars, these are.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
*****

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
May 29th, 2019 06:46 PM   Edit   Profile  

"Here's an Esquire GT. Great guitars, these are."

Wow! That's really cool! I like the carved top.
Gives me some ideas...


mroulier
Contributing Member
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Suburban MD.

You DESERVE an Ibanez Iceman!
May 30th, 2019 07:05 AM   Edit   Profile  

I have a Fender Korean-made HH Telecaster. They called it the Blackout model, and I was annoyed when they called that newer three pickup Tele with the maple neck a "Blackout"...
Mine does say Fender instead of Squire on the headstock, the Esquire models had 1 p'up and binding on the body and neck. And yes, the lack of fretboard dots was a bit daunting at first, but I adjusted! The Duncan pickups sound great and overall it's pretty nice. I paid about $400 I think.

Blackout HH

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 30th, 2019 07:50 AM   Edit   Profile  

A pal of mine had one of those MIK HH Teles. It had a fairly fat neck on it and it played like buttah. Sounded great too.

He was selling it and offered me a really good deal, but I had too many guitars already.

[blink blink]

I cannot believe I actually typed that.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
May 30th, 2019 01:27 PM   Edit   Profile  

"...I like the carved top. Gives me some ideas..."

If I were doing a set neck, I would definitely go with a carved top and also put a little angle on the neck. I like the feel of a neck with a little back angle rather than being dead parallel to the top.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 30th, 2019 01:52 PM   Edit   Profile  

I agree. It makes for a more comfy guitar.

Mokka

Switzerland

Aug 4th, 2019 02:50 PM   Edit   Profile  

Been rockin' a set neck GT Esquire for 20 years.
The original overwound SD got binned for a GF Tele Deluxe type low output hb from the start until a Gretsch-type Doozy Little Toaster took over lately. Great wide-thin neck and at just over 6 lbs, with the most playtime of the lot in the years when 3 to 4 hour gigs made that count. A super sweet guitar that's been worth its' weight in gold. See Mr. Peegoos' post above.


Strabo

Ireland

Aug 22nd, 2019 12:26 PM   Edit   Profile  

The 1998 Ritchie Blackmore signature model (which was a Japanese custom shop effort) was a set neck strat with two Lace sensors (gold, I think); two others have been made since (Japanese and US custom shop)

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