FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Sweetwater

Antique Electronics Supply

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Amplified Parts

Jensen Loudspeakers

Apex Tube Matching

MOD KITS DIY

WD Music


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / The 'Pup' Tent / pickup help

blue vista

usa

May 15th, 2019 09:22 AM   Edit   Profile  

Hi everybody it's been awhile since I posted but I need help selecting a bridge pickup for my new strat I have pv59 in it and the bridge is a little thin I don't want anything hot but something a bit fuller that will still have plenty of quack when between bridge and middle position all help greatly appreciated.

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
********

Florida

May 15th, 2019 09:25 AM   Edit   Profile  

I put a Callaham baseplate on my PV59. Subtle but effective enough for me. Doesn't have to be Callaham, Fralin use to have them as well. I use them on all my Strat bridge pickups. Just makes them a bit more mid/low focused.

(This message was last edited by littleuch at 11:30 AM, May 15th, 2019)

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
****

Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 15th, 2019 09:42 AM   Edit   Profile  

Before you think about swapping pickups, have you messed around with the height of your pickups? The tone you want just might already be in that pickup and you haven't found it yet. It's worth trying because it costs nothing but 30 minutes of your time.

1. Set the low E polepiece 1/8" from the low E string when that string is fretted at the highest fret.

2. Set the high E polepiece 3/32" from the high E string when it is fretted at the highest fret.

3. Go back and check the low E distance, adjust, and do the same once more for the high E.

If you don't have a graduated rule with 1/32" markings, you can use the smooth end of a drill bit or a hex wrench as a thickness gauge, e.g., a 3/32" drill bit.

These settings are not perfectly ideal for all pickups, but they are the accepted starting point. From here, adjust your pickups up or down by 1/2 turns of *both screws* on each pickup. Have your amp set loud, and have the guitar in the playing position (not flat on a bench or flat on your lap). Very small adjustments to pickup height can make a big difference in volume and tone from each pickup.

Note: all the above applies only when the rest of the guitar's setup is dialed in first (neck relief, nut action, string action). Pickup height is the last thing you do for a setup because any change to those three indices will affect the distance between the strings and the pickups.

blue vista

usa

May 15th, 2019 11:26 AM   Edit   Profile  

thanks Littleuch and Peegoo I knew I'd get great advice here by the way did you use wax to seal the baseplate to the pickup?

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

May 15th, 2019 11:52 AM   Edit   Profile  

A baseplate could help, that is true.

My preferred method is wax. Any paraffin from a candle will do. Red wax will sound better(just kidding)

I shave some strips, press it onto the bottom of the pickup. Then I use height adjust screws threaded down into the pickup to make sure the holes like up on the baseplate. Then, when you use a soldering iron to solder a wire to the plate which will also go to the ground side/coil start eyelet, it will melt the wax and the plate will settle onto the bobbin.

If there is already solder in place with a wire as folks like Callaham sell theirs, just run the iron around on the baseplate surface side to side. It will melt the wax fine.

Another question, is your guitar wired so that the bridge is in the tone circuit with the middle pickup on the second tone knob? I would add the jumper if not. You may have vintage wiring which leaves the bridge pickup totally open. You could raise the height of the bridge pickup, or lower the neck and middle, then use some tone control for getting a thicker tone.

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
********

Florida

May 15th, 2019 12:15 PM   Edit   Profile  

I use RTV sealer instead of wax.

blue vista

usa

May 15th, 2019 01:55 PM   Edit   Profile  

thanks Achase4u those are helpful tips and yes my bridge is wired to a tone pot, with all this good advice I think I'll be happy with the results cause I really like my pv59s.lets see now wax or RTV sealer

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

May 15th, 2019 03:15 PM   Edit   Profile  

RTV is permanent(moreso), wax is not. One thing to consider. If I want to change something back or sell it and someone wants the baseplate off, a little heat and it's off. A little naphtha and it's as clean as new.

Silicone sealant will require more force via a chisel or some other tool which is always risky around fragile pickups. It may also take brake cleaner or MEK or some other powerful thinner that would damage the coil or lacquer on the magnets.

If you are just experimenting and decide you don't like the baseplate, epoxy or silicone adhesive will be potentially work to undo.

(This message was last edited by Achase4u at 05:15 PM, May 15th, 2019)

blue vista

usa

May 15th, 2019 05:02 PM   Edit   Profile  

good point thanks I just ordered a callaham plate off ebay I'll let you all know how it worked out.

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
********

Florida

May 15th, 2019 05:45 PM   Edit   Profile  

I've had probably half a dozen or more Strat bridge pickups with baseplates, either preinstalled or added by me. Removal has never been an issue as I've always liked the results. Aaron, it seems to me wax can eventually separate, break off etc. Any experience there? Just curious as I was tempted to try that last go around (coincidently with the PV 59's) but chickened out and went RTV.



blue vista

usa

May 15th, 2019 08:37 PM   Edit   Profile  

Buy the way how do you like your pv59's I've mainly used Van Zandt pickups and always liked them but wanted something different I like how smooth the pv59's sound.

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
********

Florida

May 15th, 2019 08:48 PM   Edit   Profile  

I was pleasantly surprised, honestly. The neck pickup in particular is killer.

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

May 15th, 2019 09:54 PM   Edit   Profile  

"I've had probably half a dozen or more Strat bridge pickups with baseplates, either preinstalled or added by me. Removal has never been an issue as I've always liked the results. Aaron, it seems to me wax can eventually separate, break off etc. Any experience there? Just curious as I was tempted to try that last go around (coincidently with the PV 59's) but chickened out and went RTV."

Been doing baseplates with wax since 2008 and have yet to have one come loose. It takes a considerable amount of pressure to separate them without heat. Take one of those Gulf wax canning bars and try to break it in half with your hands. Very hard. I usually need a screwdriver/chisel and hammer to break off pieces of room temperature paraffin or beeswax to throw into the wax pot. When the wax is runny and hot, it really gets into every crevice and creates a pretty strong bond.

Now it says paraffin has a melting point of only 99 degrees, but I think that includes softening, because it takes a good 120 degrees for me to make it really turn to liquid. Otherwise everyones pickup potting wax would run out of their pickups on a summer outdoor gig, crayons would be melting, children would be crying etc.

So the only thing that could really potentially cause an issue would be leaving your guitar in a hot car I would think.

As for separating and break off, not sure why it would do that other then excessive amounts of heat. It is possible over the course of 50 or so years as I have seen before on vintage pickups, but I'm not sure how silicone would have held up that many decades either.

What is your process for pulling it apart? What exact product are you using? Most of the ones I find have references to "permanent" in their description or title. If it's easily removable and also allows the plate to be flush with the bottom of the pickup without making a gap, then I stand corrected.



littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
********

Florida

May 16th, 2019 05:45 AM   Edit   Profile  

Thanks Aaron, I guess I underestimated the heartiness of wax. The first pickup I ever had the baseplate on was a set of Fralin's that came preinstalled. That was a long time ago and for all I know wax was used. The few I installed I used RTV from my work toolkit that I was able to order for field copier repair. Can't remember the brand, just the nasty acidic smell, lol. The most recent one I bought from Lowes(DAP Auto/Marine Sealant 100% RTV Silicone). I pretty much followed these instructions.

YouTube link

(This message was last edited by littleuch at 10:03 AM, May 16th, 2019)

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

May 16th, 2019 09:12 AM   Edit   Profile  

I'm going to try one your way and see what it's like to apply and remove. Off to Lowe's.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
****

Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 16th, 2019 09:25 AM   Edit   Profile  

The big drawback for me with RTV silicone is the acetic acid fumes it gives off: it's corrosive to metals and is deadly to electronics. That vinegar smell is the acetic acid fumes.

It's why there are acid-free silicone gel formulas developed specifically for electronics use (PC board conformal coating, etc.) to seal out moisture.

You'd do better to use a solvent-based adhesive such as contact cement, E6000, or similar.

But paraffin wax is plenty robust for base plates.

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 11:26 AM, May 16th, 2019)

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

May 16th, 2019 09:47 AM   Edit   Profile  

Ahhhhh. Yes, acetic acid fumes aren't good. You don't want to start rust/oxidation in on the bottom of those magnet poles. That's the beginning of the end for a pickup. Interesting!

FDP Forum / The 'Pup' Tent / pickup help




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2019 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved