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FDP Forum / Miscellaneous and Non-Fender Topics / Stop Tailpiece Observations / Experiment Findings

Gene from Tampa
Contributing Member
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Tampa, FL

Press On Irregardless
May 10th, 2019 11:36 AM   Edit   Profile  

I read how raising a stop tailpiece can lead to a looser feel to the strings. I decided to raise the tailpiece on my Gibby LP Traditional from decked to match as closely as I could the angle the strings across the nut. (When decked the strings just clear the back of the bridge - they weren't touching the bridge). So I then try some string bending etc and yup, it's definitely easier to bend them and vibrato etc. Happy, I hung it on the stand and went about my business. A day or two later I pick it up and oh-oh! All strings buzz on the first, and to a lesser degree, second fret. So I get out the metal ruler and feeler gauges and see the relief is now .005 ... a little too straight. So I set it to .010 and while better, still some buzz. Loosen the trussrod some more and at a loose .012+ the buzzing more or less goes away but now the action is too high. Lower the bridge and buzzing returns! So I'm fiddling around and realize hey stupid head! Re-deck the tailpiece and see what happens. Low and behold no buzzing. So back to resetting relief, and lowering string action back to where I started. I should note this guitar was factory pleked and the 1st/2nd fret action is low to begin with. It never dawned on me that raising a tailpiece would reduce pressure on the trussrod and cause buzzing etc. But it did prove that raising it makes the setup looser and now I know why.

frogman
Contributing Member
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Pueblo, Co

I qualify!
May 10th, 2019 01:33 PM   Edit   Profile  

I have half a dozen Les Paul's and honestly I have never experienced a difference when raising the stop bar. I suspect it is my sense that is amiss!

I have however noticed a difference when wrapping my strings over the bar.....some folks say it just looks awful when they are over the top but I think it looks pretty cool and it also leaves little need to raise the tail piece.

BTW, your LP is a Beauty! Very clean.

(This message was last edited by frogman at 03:34 PM, May 10th, 2019)

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 10th, 2019 03:03 PM   Edit   Profile  

I've never experienced that. I wonder what's going on with that guitar.

Gene from Tampa
Contributing Member
**********

Tampa, FL

Press On Irregardless
May 10th, 2019 03:09 PM   Edit   Profile  

Yeah, it took some time for me to figure it out. Back the way it was and plays in tune with low action and no buzzing. My only other guitar with a stop tailpiece is an Epi ES-339. I also have it decked right now (more sustain in theory) but I may fool around with it.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 10th, 2019 03:19 PM   Edit   Profile  

There's a lot of uninformed discussion in the guitar community about how force from string tension is transferred from a stop tailpiece to the body.

When it comes to through-stringing a stop bar or over-wrapping it, the angle of the strings over the saddles is what governs the force created by string tension. If the angle is the same in both methods of anchoring the strings, the force is identical in both methods. Over-wrapping does not in itself reduce or increase that force.

Change the angle, however, and there's a change in force and a change in feel.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
May 10th, 2019 05:28 PM   Edit   Profile  

I've done the same experiment you describe, cranking the tailpiece up or down to change the bending feel, and never experienced any change in relief, action height or string buzz. Just doesn't make sense to me, I think something else must be going on.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Planet Peegoo

Rhythm & Lewd Guitarist
May 10th, 2019 07:09 PM   Edit   Profile  

I wonder if perhaps it had something to do with loosening the strings to make the height changes.

Perhaps the truss rod (still in full tension) induced a back-bow in the neck while the strings were slack. This is certainly a puzzle.

FDP Forum / Miscellaneous and Non-Fender Topics / Stop Tailpiece Observations / Experiment Findings




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