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FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Basics of soldering (teaching soldering)

Stratrocker

USA

good welder, crappy guitar player
Jan 31st, 2019 10:25 AM   Edit   Profile  

I'm a certified welder and full-time instructor (all major processes) but the only soldering I do is my occasional guitar projects, repairs, upgrades, etc. I don't consider myself to be an "expert" in electronic soldering. Regardless, a local "Makerspace" has asked me if I'd be interested in doing a class on basic soldering techniques. I'm considering it. I could teach the basics. Any thoughts on what I should include in the training? Obviously, safety will be discussed. Thank you.

LeftyMeister
Contributing Member
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Buckeye Country, USA

Tone is in the lingers
Jan 31st, 2019 10:43 AM   Edit   Profile  

Rule #1: Tin the tip :o)

Therealfrogman
Contributing Member
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Pueblo, Co

I qualify!
Jan 31st, 2019 10:51 AM   Edit   Profile  

Rule #1 is a must but my limited experience has shown me that cooling my tip before I touch and pots has been a boon of success. I have also learned from this approach how to create a tidy blob wherever needed.



wrnchbndr
Contributing Member
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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Jan 31st, 2019 11:43 AM   Edit   Profile  

I've considered doing something similar. I think it comes down to sharing enough information so the students have the foundation to evaluate the jobs they are likely to encounter and then have the ability to apply it to the weird situations they are going to be faced with. My idea was to compile a tool box of reasonable quality tools and require that the students buy it first. Probably around $150 worth of tools with a Weller adjustable temp iron and a soldering gun, solder sucker, wicking wire, good wire cutters, forceps, heat sinks, solder and flux and other stuff...
Understanding solder joints, types of wire and insulations, stripping wire, tinning wire, dealing with shielded wire, soldering to lugs, soldering multiple wires to lugs, soldering shielded wire, soldering grounds, unsoldering wires, splicing wire, using heat shrink, replacing connectors on cables, removing and replacing connectors and components on circuit boards, using heat sinks, care and maintenance of the soldering tools...the list goes on and could forever. Define your goal and you'll know what you need to include.

littleuch
Contributing Member
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Ocala, Florida

pwn me like it's 1999
Jan 31st, 2019 12:21 PM   Edit   Profile  

I should develop some kind of glove apparatus that would steady the hand. I don't know if it's Essential Tremors or what, but as of late I start shaking as I approach my points of contact. It doesn't really happen in other circumstances, but jeez-louise, you'd think I'm getting ready to diffuse a bomb.

wrnchbndr
Contributing Member
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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Jan 31st, 2019 01:31 PM   Edit   Profile  

I find that sometimes I need to reevaluate my seating position and posture along with repositioning the work to get a steady hand. Its good to step back and evaluate wtf is wrong. You might be unknowingly in a hurry or stressed and most likely stressed about something you don't need to be. Too much coffee? Personally, I'm pissed off about being over 50.
There's good reason to pre-tin, bend a hook, and achieve a physical steady connection by crimping the wire in place so you can be hands-free.
Consider slowing down, having a slice of pecan pie... I occasionally get shakey myself and its usually something in my head.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Just beyond Mars

there's a world of fools
Jan 31st, 2019 03:40 PM   Edit   Profile  

This is a great opportunity! Teaching people to solder lifts the veil of mystery and allows anyone to do simple repairs on stuff.

Here are the important points:

-Clean hands (no oil/grease/etc.)

-Hot iron

-Clean tip (keep it wiped)

-Tinned tip (keep it tinned)

-Pre-tin the leads/terminals to be joined

-Make a clean mechanical joint (bend/twist wires)

-Use rosin-core solder (not acid core)

-Apply iron to joint, let heat

-Apply solder to joint, not iron tip

-Flow in a small amount of solder

-Withdraw solder

-Withdraw iron

-Keep joint immobile until cool

-Smooth shiny silver joint = good

-Granular gray joint = bad

Done!

Don't forget to lead in with basic safety stuff, like

-Safety glasses

-A fan to divert fumes

-Dangers of molten metal (burn risk)

-Dangers of heated iron (burn risk)

-Dangers of working in energized circuits (unplug stuff)

Etc.

Stratrocker

USA

good welder, crappy guitar player
Jan 31st, 2019 07:18 PM   Edit   Profile  

You guys ROCK!!!! :)

wrnchbndr
Contributing Member
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New Jersey

I'm back with the otters again
Jan 31st, 2019 08:20 PM   Edit   Profile  

If you can find it, and I know that it is available on the internet, there is a very good fundamentals block study guide used by the USAF and the Army and it hasn't changed in 45 years. Its a solid teaching reference. If anyone knows the designation for this it would be great. I tried a few google searches unsuccessfully but I have seen it.

Pinetree
Moderator Emeritus
(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

Jan 31st, 2019 09:23 PM   Edit   Profile  

Try

this.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Just beyond Mars

there's a world of fools
Jan 31st, 2019 11:24 PM   Edit   Profile  

TO 25-259 is the one you want.

Click

here and it will download the PDF to your desktop.

(This message was last edited by Peegoo at 01:25 AM, Feb 1st, 2019)

Gaukdawg

Ohio

Say what one more time!
Feb 1st, 2019 08:34 AM   Edit   Profile  

I was going to suggest using you tube for soldering basic but Pinetree and Peegoo gave better references. I went through a 2 week soldering class when I was in the Air Force. When you solder weapons delivery system components they want to make sure it's a really good connection. I was also CIRF certified. It is second nature for me. The biggest issue I have now is my eyesight getting worse.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Just beyond Mars

there's a world of fools
Feb 1st, 2019 09:04 AM   Edit   Profile  

Gaukdawg,

git'cherself one of these-uns.

henrycat
Contributing Member
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Pictou, N.S. Canada

He said he was a wit. He was half right.
Feb 8th, 2019 11:22 AM   Edit   Profile  

A hot soldering iron looks the same as a cold soldering iron.

Get a "fisherman's friend" device to hold components while you work on them.

Good Luck with the course. I learned by trial and error, which is not the best way to do it.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Just beyond Mars

there's a world of fools
Feb 8th, 2019 12:34 PM   Edit   Profile  

Also known as a "Helping Hands."

If you don't want to spend $$, you can make your own version really simply and cheaply: get a hunk of wood (size doesn't matter, heh heh) but a piece of 2x4 about 4" long is perfect. See link below for an engineering drawing I had done for this item that contains metrology necessary for CNC fabrication if you so desire.

With the block of wood laying flat, drill a 1/4" diameter hole in the top, dead center, about 1" deep.

Stand the block on its side, and drill a hole 1" deep in the center of all four sides. If you have a small countersink, add a 1/16" chamfer to each of the six holes (top & bottom, and the four sides). Lastly, glue a wooden clothespin to the top near one edge.

You can add four stick-on rubber feet to the bottom corners, but it's not required.

With this little block laying flat, you can stick the shaft of a pot or the pointy end of a 90-degree plug in the top hole, and it is held securely for soldering wires to the tabs. The holes on the sides are for soldering cables to straight plugs. The clothespin holds wires and other odd parts steady.

This little block is good for just about any soldering tasks necessary for guitar and amp work.

I made one of these years ago, and it actually gets more use than the ancient Helping Hands I got from Radio Shack in the early 80s.

PeegooCAD here

Pinetree
Moderator Emeritus
(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

Feb 9th, 2019 06:50 AM   Edit   Profile  

I made

This thing.

(This message was last edited by Pinetree at 08:53 AM, Feb 9th, 2019)

Pinetree
Moderator Emeritus
(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

Feb 9th, 2019 06:50 AM   Edit   Profile  

And Rule #1 is "Heat the work, not the Solder."

(This message was last edited by Pinetree at 08:54 AM, Feb 9th, 2019)

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Just beyond Mars

there's a world of fools
Feb 9th, 2019 08:11 PM   Edit   Profile  

That device has duplex operation: horizontal AND vertical!

Pinetree
Moderator Emeritus
(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

Feb 10th, 2019 12:19 AM   Edit   Profile  

Indeed.

There's felt on two sides to let it slide around my bench a little.


It's 316 Stainless, so it's quite heavy.



Peegoo
Contributing Member
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Just beyond Mars

there's a world of fools
Feb 10th, 2019 07:35 AM   Edit   Profile  

American steel!

FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Basics of soldering (teaching soldering)




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