FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

MOD KITS DIY

Antique Electronics Supply

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Jensen Loudspeakers

Sweetwater

Apex Tube Matching

Amplified Parts

WD Music


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Performer's Corner / PA for corporate gigs?

jaguarplayer

NYC, United States

Dec 2nd, 2018 09:57 PM   Edit   Profile  

I play in a workplace band at a tech company. Couple times a year we play a show at the office - an "open mic" kind of thing.

To date, we have rented a PA from Guitar Center every time. I've been asked to work up a proposal for us to buy a PA so we don't have to rent anymore.

I really don't know anything about sound equipment; I myself have only been playing a couple years.

Considerations:
- recreational (not professional) use by a wide variety of musicians with skills ranging from semi-pro to beginner
- the room itself is a concrete-floored, window-rimmed box, very very large, with acoustic ceiling tiles
- the PA has to be easy to use by non-professionals
- musicians range from acoustic singer-songwriters to full rock bands
- usually not more than 2 or max 3 people singing (mic'd) at once
- we don't have a sound engineer on-staff. in the past the more experienced musicians in the show have run sound, or I outsource it, but the PA shouldn't be so difficult to learn that we can't learn to run it ourselves.

Any recommendations welcomed.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
**

Results not typical.

Do not try this at home.
Dec 3rd, 2018 08:07 AM   Edit   Profile  

A PA is sized by the venue size and audience size. How many people will be the max-size crowd?

There are two ways to approach this, either a powered mixer, or a passive mixer with powered speakers. The powered mixer option would be something like the following:

-A box-top powered mixer such as Yamaha, etc., with six inputs and at least 500 watts per channel
-Four mics (Shure SM58)
-Four mic stands
-Four 20' mic cables
-One 30' six-channel snake
-Two 15" 2-way speakers (Peavey, etc.)
-Two 50-foot 12-ga speaker cables
-Two speaker stands
-One 50-foot 12-ga extension cord and power strip for the mixer

The passive mixer option would be something like:

-A passive mixer such as Yamaha, etc., with six inputs
-Four mics (Shure SM58)
-Four mic stands
-Four 20' mic cables
-One 30' six-channel snake
-Two 15" powered 2-way speakers (Peavey, etc.), 500 watts minimum
-Two 50-foot XLR speaker cables
-Two speaker stands
-Two 50-foot 12-ga extension cords for the speakers
-One 50-foot extension cord and power strip for the mixer

A few notes:

The "extra" mics and cables may not always be used; they also serve as spares if one of your two stage mics or cables fails.

A snake is great because it prevents having to run mic cables directly to the mixer. If you don't go with the snake option, your mic cables need to be longer.

Consider how all this will be transported if the need arises. A large footlocker on wheels is ideal for everything but the speakers and speaker stands. Consider soft padded bags for the speakers and a padded bag for the mic stands. Even in storage, it's good to have all this stuff protected.

Create a step-by-step setup and operation manual, and color code (or number) all connections so any yuckapuck like me can read 'em and get it up and running.

A really good option to help you get all this together is someone in your organization that plays in a church band or choir and is familiar with pro sound.

Tony Wright and Roly will also chime in here because they are the resident experts on pro sound, and they always offer great advice.

jaguarplayer

NYC, United States

Dec 3rd, 2018 08:52 AM   Edit   Profile  

Is it possible to buy all of this as a package? That's my fantasy.


Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
**

Results not typical.

Do not try this at home.
Dec 3rd, 2018 09:15 AM   Edit   Profile  

Call Sweetwater or MF (links above) and they can assemble a complete kit for you based on your needs and budget.

jaguarplayer

NYC, United States

Dec 3rd, 2018 09:35 AM   Edit   Profile  

i don't have a budget - i've been asked to work up a proposal.

Gaukdawg

Ohio

Say what one more time!
Dec 3rd, 2018 10:22 AM   Edit   Profile  

Peegoo is absolutely correct. Call Sweetwater and talk to your salesperson. If you just explain to them exactly what you wrote on the forum and give them a price range they can set you up with equipment to meet your needs. I bet they even give you a decent price for all this stuff. We did a similar thing where I work and they bought a small PA just for practice. They always hired out for sound at events because it was always large crowds and outside. It's fun using lunch for rehearsals a couple times a week.

I do not work for Sweetwater

jaguarplayer

NYC, United States

Dec 3rd, 2018 11:39 AM   Edit   Profile  

yeah, i just don't have a budget and without knowing what i need and what i don't, i'm an easy target to be talked into things i don't actually need.

but i will take the advice to call SW and use their expertise. thanks.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
**

Results not typical.

Do not try this at home.
Dec 3rd, 2018 12:25 PM   Edit   Profile  

Ask for Joe Secu at Sweetwater. Let him know you're a member here at one of their sponsored sites. He's a pro and a straight shooter.

jaguarplayer

NYC, United States

Dec 3rd, 2018 12:51 PM   Edit   Profile  

now that's what i call a pro tip! thanks!


Tony Wright
Contributing Member
****

Stillwater, OK

I never met a calorie I didn't like.
Dec 4th, 2018 06:24 AM   Edit   Profile  

I would agree with most of what Peegoo suggested.

I like the "Buy once, cry once" approach. (Cry over the sticker price and don't look back.)

I would opt for an 8 channel powered mixer just in case you need to plug in a keyboard and/or an acoustic electric guitar.

I prefer lightweight cabinets. Yamaha and JBL and Electro-Voice among others have very nice cabinets that are the UNpowered version of their Powered speakers.

They are not the cheapest products on the market but they are high quality sound. Personally, I like 3 monitors rather than just two. I want the drummer and bass player on the back row to hear as well as the front line. To accomplish that, ONE powered speaker would be required out of the typical 4 Ohm powered mixer...yes you can run passive monitors on a powered mixer AND also run the powered speakers on the same powered mixer.

If interested, let me know, but PeeGoo and Roly and at least a half dozen other guys can jump in. Me? I am late to work at my day job...and I have a load in tonight...I am providing stage lighting for a children's ballet production of The Nutcracker. And the Osage Nation takes their ballet seriously.

tahitijack
Contributing Member
****

San Clemente, CA

Happy Sunsets, tahitijack
Dec 4th, 2018 05:35 PM   Edit   Profile  

Great advice so far.

Can you tell us what you rented so far? What did you like and dislike about the gear from Guitar Center? In addition to Sweetwater, visit GC and ask them for advice get product details.

jaguarplayer

NYC, United States

Dec 6th, 2018 08:29 AM   Edit   Profile  

I can't say I liked or disliked it because I didn't use it - I know so little about it that I couldn't set it up or run it myself.

tahitijack
Contributing Member
****

San Clemente, CA

Happy Sunsets, tahitijack
Dec 7th, 2018 09:01 AM   Edit   Profile  

Maybe the person that is actually setting up and running the PA should be tasked with writing the business case and budget proposal.

jaguarplayer

NYC, United States

Dec 11th, 2018 10:36 AM   Edit   Profile  

That person is me.

Tony Wright

Stillwater, OK

I never met a calorie I didn't like.
Dec 14th, 2018 10:54 PM   Edit   Profile  

What is this nonsense "NOT professionals?" Are you an employee of the company? Are you on "company time"? then you are being paid to play...the definition of "professional" is being paid to do something. By the way, is the company pushing for the sound system purchase or is it members of the band? If YOU are uncomfortable being the "sound guy" or "band leader" or "event organizer" step aside and let one of the others who are pushing from behind become the person up front....easy-peasey.

How to Set Up a PA:
Tab A into Slot B...simple....

Learn how to plug stuff in.

READ THE MANUAL. Look it up online and download the manual for the mixer you are going to rent (or purchase).

What do you plan to reinforce or amplify thru this PA system? Vocal? Acoustic/electric guitar? Electric guitars only? Both A/E and electric? Bass guitar? Any of those have a stage amp? Yes? Then WHY are you running them in the PA too? Keyboard thru the PA or stage amp?

For that matter, who is buying this PA system...get them involved, because if they are paying, I could package a really nice PA for around $7500. Or I could package a decent PA made up of used components for around $1200. Of course, the size of the venue will have a lot to do with WHAT SYSTEM to buy...as will WHAT WILL YOU PUT INTO THE MIXER. example, if you need 4 vocal mics and a channel for 3 guitars, a bass and a keyboard...a 6 channel PA is a waste of money. Obvious but you haven't shared the right pieces of information to get a specific suggestion.

Typically, MY advice is to mic only the vocals and those instruments that do not have a stage amp in most small to medium size venues. (150 people or less.)

OK, back to how to plug it:

Pick a place to start. The mixer is a good place. Read the manual. Plug it in, connect a sound source (mp3 player, laptop, etc) experiment, it should be simple and you should start to catch on. You DO know how to get the tone you want out of your guitar amp, right? The PA mixer is similar in operation. You do know how to plug in speakers, right?

Go find YouTube video that shows how to set up a small PA system. Watch 3 or 4...see how they differ. It would not hurt if you took an iPad or laptop, etc. and got the close up photo of the mixer you think is the "right one". Now try to follow along with the "how to" video with the photo in front of you....can you find similar named components? Making progress.

Get some plan...come back and let us knock it down and step on it too. Go read the "Small Venue Question" in this same forum, posted by 6 Cylinder Slim. Lots of good discussion and some would help you as well.

tahitijack
Contributing Member
****

San Clemente, CA

Happy Sunsets, tahitijack
Dec 22nd, 2018 11:03 AM   Edit   Profile  

As usual Tony is Wright.

If you are looking for a magic pill there is nothing. But, but, but here is what I'd do.... purchase two or three Bose stick and base systems. Upper management will probably recognize brand/cost. Simple plug and play. Not the best but it's good.

(This message was last edited by tahitijack at 01:05 PM, Dec 22nd, 2018)

FDP Forum / Performer's Corner / PA for corporate gigs?




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2019 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved