FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

MOD KITS DIY

Sweetwater

Amplified Parts

Jensen Loudspeakers

Apex Tube Matching

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

WD Music

Antique Electronics Supply


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Fender Bass Guitars and Bass Amps / play long scale, practice short scale ?

windmill
Contributing Member
**********
********

Australia

older,better
Sep 25th, 2018 09:52 PM   Edit   Profile  

Have a short scale Teisco bass that I play unplugged around the house,in front of the computer, sitting outside and take to my weekly lesson.
But I play a long scale when playing out.
Rarely practice with the long scale unless its a big occasion or there are some new songs to learn.

The actual playing ratio is about 70% short/ 30% long.

Anyone do this ?
or maybe the opposite?

(This message was last edited by windmill at 12:02 AM, Sep 26th, 2018)

Taildragger
Contributing Member
**********
***

USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Sep 25th, 2018 10:21 PM   Edit   Profile  

All shorties, all the time, here.

rwb

Canada

The Plankster of Love
Sep 26th, 2018 12:54 AM   Edit   Profile  

I mix them up. I have several Fender long scales, and two short scales, an old Danelectro and a modern Reverend, both 30" scale. The Dano is especially teeny weeny, because the bridge is at the very end of the body, whereas the Reverend is bigger overall. Very different necks, with the Dano being super thing. Fun to play, all of them. Variety is the spice of life!

Rick Knight
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**

St Peters, MO USA

Busy doing something close to nothing
Sep 26th, 2018 07:23 AM   Edit   Profile  

I split the difference and play medium scales.

(This message was last edited by Rick Knight at 09:27 AM, Sep 26th, 2018)

hushnel
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*

North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
Sep 26th, 2018 10:21 AM   Edit   Profile  

I play them all, the 20" and 30" in the living room in the Lazyboy, the 30" or 32" at rehearsal and the 32" or 34" when working.

I built the 20" so I could take a bass when I rode the Harley, I'll use it at jams and open mic's on occasion. It gives people a measured first opinion of me that I can immediately reverse once they hear me play the stripper cigar box :o)

The 32" Starfire is working it's way to the top, the more I use it, the more I appreciate what it does.

Just in case you question the tackiness of 20 incher

Taildragger
Contributing Member
**********
***

USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Sep 26th, 2018 10:24 AM   Edit   Profile  

"Starfire is working it's way to the top, the more I use it, the more I appreciate what it does."

Yep: they totally rock, IMHO.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********
*

As old as the sun

with white teeth
Sep 29th, 2018 12:49 AM   Edit   Profile  

That cigar bass uke is a peach!

Taildragger
Contributing Member
**********
***

USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Sep 29th, 2018 11:00 AM   Edit   Profile  

"The 32" Starfire is working it's way to the top"

BTW: Not to be nit-picky, but unless you (or a previous owner) have altered it, the Starfire's scale length is 30.75"(short). The reason they require most brand's medium-scale sets is because of the distance between the bridge saddles and the bridge string anchor points, not because they actually have a medium scale length (nut to bridge saddles or nut to 12th fret X 2).

String-through Fender Mustangs also use medium-scale sets for a similar reason: the distance between the bridge saddles and the string ferrules on the back of the body. This differs from the current, "PJ" Mustangs, whose bridges are top-loaders.

hushnel
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*

North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
Sep 29th, 2018 01:45 PM   Edit   Profile  

I didn't know that, I bought it from a factory/discount center, didn't come with paperwork. I guess I assumed 32" since the nut was further away from me than my 30" basses.

SecondHoneymoon
Contributing Member
**********

Columbia, SC

Sep 29th, 2018 01:58 PM   Edit   Profile  

My brother has my Teisco bass that I got for Christmas 52 years ago. I always dismissed it as a cheap guitar, and usually conned my bandmates brother into lending me his P Bass for gigs which was clearly a better instrument.

This past year I visited my brother and he has a nice new bass amp. Wow! I was blown away with how good ithe Teisco sounded! And was fun to play. I can get it back, but I have to buy him a p bass as a replacement. I don't really play bass, but that old Teisco really surprised me!

(This message was last edited by SecondHoneymoon at 04:00 PM, Sep 29th, 2018)

Taildragger
Contributing Member
**********
***

USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Sep 29th, 2018 02:44 PM   Edit   Profile  

I guess I assumed 32" since the nut was further away from me than my 30" basses.

Bridge positioning on shorties makes a big difference as far as how "big" they feel. The closer the bridge is to the edge of the body, the smaller the instrument feels (all else being equal) because the nut actually IS closer to the player. As the bridge position moves further out into the middle of the body, the nut moves away, making the bass feel longer.

In the linked PIC below, the bridge saddles and nuts of the two basses are approximately aligned. Note that the Mustang, in addition to having a physically smaller body, also has it's bridge positioned closer to the edge of the lower bout than the Starfire does. Yet (despite having a different number of frets-19 vs. 21) the scale lengths of the two instruments are approximately the same.

Starfire vs. Mustang bridge position:

(This message was last edited by Taildragger at 04:53 PM, Sep 29th, 2018)

hushnel
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*

North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
Sep 29th, 2018 05:32 PM   Edit   Profile  

Yeah, I get it. The last two I built are 30” and the lower bout is much shorter.

The one linked below is a very small body, proportioned to optimizd the weight and balance. Plus the board was only 8” wide. After edging it was getting kind of narrow.

The roasted two by four

(This message was last edited by hushnel at 09:40 PM, Sep 29th, 2018)

Taildragger
Contributing Member
**********
***

USA

an acquired taste some may never acquire
Sep 29th, 2018 05:52 PM   Edit   Profile  

Cool looking Framus, H. I dig narrow necks/narrow string spacing like that.

Admire your mastery of fretless. Being a relative newcomer/crossover (guitar to bass) with only a few years experience on the latter, I have yet to add playing fretless to my limited skill set.

Thanks for sharing the PICs of your home builds.

(This message was last edited by Taildragger at 08:07 PM, Sep 29th, 2018)

windmill
Contributing Member
**********
********

Australia

older,better
Sep 29th, 2018 05:55 PM   Edit   Profile  

re secondhoneymoon

"I was blown away with how good ithe Teisco sounded! And was fun to play."

While mine is noisey due to the type of pickup, it does sound good plugged in and it is also fun to play !

:)

hushnel
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*

North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
Sep 29th, 2018 07:52 PM   Edit   Profile  

I had problems with the Framus for years. It did work for me but it was really tough to get decent intonation up the neck.

It worked and was my one and only from 1965 to 1981 when I purchased the Precision Special. I even took into a shop when I lived in Pittsburgh back in the late 70s. They had it a week and told me nothing could be done.

A few years back I cleared off one of my benches clean and go over the Framus. Even put new strings on it. When I checked and set the intonation, after years of building and setting up instruments, I immediately figured out the problems and addressed them. The freakin thing sounds and plays great, intonation is spot on. The bridge was at least 3/4 of an inch too close to the pickup. All those years of bending the strings into intonation starting around the fifth fret could have been avoided If I knew then what I know now.

FDP Forum / Fender Bass Guitars and Bass Amps / play long scale, practice short scale ?




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2019 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved