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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Need rear brake pads -- Are these pads & rotors OK?

009
Contributing Member
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USA

Jun 29th, 2018 12:29 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I got an oil change today and was told that there are only 2 mm left on my rear pads. I think these are the original brake pads, @ 163.5 K miles...? Anyway, the shop wants so much money just for pads & labor. I'm going to give this a try. Revisited Rock Auto and these look good, better than OEM quality. The price is OK for me. (The shop didn't say anything whatsoever about the calipers.)

Good video overview:

POWER STOP K5211 -- Z23 Evolution Sport

Elmo66
Contributing Member
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Midwest USA

Jun 29th, 2018 12:40 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You'll probably need a special caliper brake tool to rotate the caliper in to make room for the new pads on the rear brakes. Free to rent from most auto stores.

Hardest part is removiing the old rotor from the hub; get some penetrating oil. Put anti-sieze on hub before putting on new rotor.

Also be sure to clean the new rotors with brake cleaner.

All in all, a fairly simple job.

ECS-3
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USA / Virginia

Jun 29th, 2018 01:13 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Unless the shop said your rotors are bad why don't you just change the pads?



009
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USA

Jun 29th, 2018 01:28 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My understanding is that rotors, to varying degrees, are uniquely worn in a pattern matching the pads applied to them. In the old days, turning the rotors was always done (and if they ended up being too thin, then replaced) -- always done & included in the brake job fee. Nowadays, you have to pay for turning the rotors ($30) and if they end up too thin, I don't think they waive that $30 fee... Anyway, my car is now 12 years old with 163 K miles -- I'll treat myself. If this experience turns out to be positive, I'll also do the front brakes. Brake jobs are so expensive, and seems to be a fabricated money-maker, just as I found when replacing my struts & shocks. This same shop told me that I had a leaking strut (shock component), and I ended up saving Hundreds of dollars doing it myself (Rock Auto is great.) The last time I was in, they told me that my strut was leaking -- same story! I think they tell lots of customers this; great money-maker! I'm thinking now that I did not need to replace my struts and shocks after all....

Anyway, after watching that brake advertisement/descriptive video, I'm leaning towards this set of pads and rotors. I've scanned YouTube for "How To" videos, and added several to my Favorites folder for viewing later.

The shop also said I have some left front rubber boot that is cracked/torn -- that needs replacement. Telling me it's a big job to get to it, etc., etc., and quoting big bucks. If I don't do it, the joint will wear out. Yada Yada $$. Maybe I'll just put some Gorilla Glue on it. ;-)

(This message was last edited by 009 at 04:27 PM, Jun 29th, 2018)

dudesweet157
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Greensboro, NC

You're the reason our kids are ugly
Jun 29th, 2018 02:09 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Pads are super duper easy. It takes me more time to raise the car with the emergency jack and take the tires off than it does to replace the pads.

Rotors can be a little tricky to get off, depending on the manufacturer. I think the last time I did it on my latest car, I needed a special tool. I got from Autozone for free (left a deposit, my deposit was returned when I brought it back). You can probably google your specific model to to see if you need a non-standard tool.

(This message was last edited by dudesweet157 at 04:10 PM, Jun 29th, 2018)

009
Contributing Member
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USA

Jun 29th, 2018 02:29 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks, all. I'll order the set next week and do the installation shortly after receiving the parts. I'll pick up the expendables at AutoZone in the mean time.

K4
Contributing Member
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Being defenseless

does not make you more safe
Jun 29th, 2018 03:36 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You are correct, changing the rotor with the pads is the proper way of doing it.

I always replace the calipers as well, and at your mileage I'd change out the hoses.

If you do it this way it should last another 162K

It's a good idea to flush the brake fluid, just let it drip into a pan until it looks clear. Should take about a small can of new fluid,just don't let the master run dry.

gmanNJ
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Joisey

Jul 1st, 2018 04:43 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

they make a "split boot" so you dont have to remove the axle to repair. It wraps around and super glues in place. they dont tear open. Sold a ton when I worked in auto parts stores. 15 min home job which is why the shop did not offer it

take a look into it

Split CV boot

K4
Contributing Member
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Being defenseless

does not make you more safe
Jul 1st, 2018 10:05 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Those split boots are about as good as a band aid.

The reason the shop didn't offer it is because they don't last and the shop doesn't want to keep putting new ones on every week.

009
Contributing Member
*********

USA

Jul 2nd, 2018 06:10 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

A few minutes ago I didn’t know anything about CV joints and boots. I’ve linked a nice overview in case someone wants to read about these.

After reading, I can see the appeal (shortcut) of using a split boot — what a PITA any CV joint work is! Well, I have access to a lift and access to some expertise (a guy), so we’ll take a look soon, not only at the boot, but also check out the brakes. I’ve been “researching” parts online. I’ll opt for OE grade rotors — smooth, instead of the “performance” version with the slots and holes in them (as I’ve read that brake pads wear out faster with these rotors; my car and I aren’t very “performance” anyway). Replacing the calipers and hoses is a good idea, but the overall cost (and work) of the brake job doubles (at least) when opting for that. Again, it’s tempting to take the “shortcut” and just replace the rotors and pads, with a optimistically justifying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” But, in my heart I know what I should do. When I check out the car on the lift, I’ll finalize my parts list. I hope this turns out to be fun.

Info - CV joints and boots

(This message was last edited by 009 at 11:57 AM, Jul 2nd, 2018)

NoSoapRadio
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Mass., Amerika

CO2 ... is there anything it can't do?
Jul 2nd, 2018 02:26 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"I hope this turns out to be fun."

I can't even say how many brake jobs I've done over the years -- but I can say that it's never been fun.

A couple things I haven't seen mentioned -- make sure you get the hardware kit. Pad clips and slide pin boots at least. Make sure you really clean the corrosion on the caliper mounting brackets where the pad clips are installed.

Clean and re-lube the slide pins and the mating hole in the caliper bracket.

You are doing the rear brakes so you need to be prepared for a problem with the parking brake mechanism inside the drum of the rotor. Since I do the rears about once for every three times I do the fronts, I just replace the e-brake shoes and hardware as long as I'm in there.

It appears that you have done a lot of youtube watching so I assume you known how to back the shoes off so you can remove the rotor.

Good luck. Buy plenty of Brakleen, shop towels, a box of nitrile gloves, and band-aids.

slacker
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Hawkeye Country

Thread crapping is unbecoming
Jul 2nd, 2018 02:52 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Good luck. I'm currently mired in rear brake pads/rotors hell.

We started with the passenger side and the caliper, pads and mounting bracket came off easily. The rotor...not so much. This is a subaru and the rotors have a 8mm threaded hole that you can run bolts into to break the rotor free. That worked fine but the parking brake would not let go of the rotor. Not really knowing what we were doing, we ran the bolts into the rotor further trying to get the rotor off, eventually snapping the little "nuts" on the retaining pins. After much screaming and gnashing of teeth we got the rotor off.

Now we needed to replace the retaining pin hardware, so we ordered a hardware kit and had to wait until the next day. Meanwhile, lesson learned, we got the other side done with no real drama.

The hardware arrived and I expected to just put the new retaining pins/springs on, reinstall the rotor and reassemble the bracket, pads and caliper. No such luck.

The parking brake assembly on that side behaves as if the parking brake is set. Even with the adjuster set all the way loose, we cannot come close to getting the rotor back on. The Subaru has an electronic parking brake and it won't let me do anything with the brakes disassembled, so there's no way to try to work it loose. At this point we don't know what we're going to do. My mechanic friend said I might be able to access the cable assembly on the backside to work it loose, but I haven't had a chance to try.

After about 14 hours of very frustrating work, including about 5 trips to the auto parts store, I still don't have it put back together and don't know how I'm going to get it back together.

I'm going to look into whether I can remove the parking brake shoes, put it together and take it to a shop to see if they can figure it out. Otherwise, I'm kinda screwed.

If the first one had gone like the second, we'd have been done in about 90 minutes.

I hope the whole thing for you goes like my second side did.

009
Contributing Member
*********

USA

Jul 2nd, 2018 03:27 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I won't get a chance to look at the car for over a week -- got a lot of things going on. So, I haven't reviewed the YouTube videos much, yet.

BUT, hey, thanks for the warning about the e-brake shoes! You too, slacker!

"slide pin BOOTS..." I'll have to check that out. I've only applied my e-brake about 10 times during the 12 past years. So, I'm thinking of just cleaning things up and letting that remain "as is."

BbendFender
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American Patriot

About as ordinary as you can get.
Jul 2nd, 2018 03:48 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I have gotten by with replacing only the pads on numerous occasions. I didn't have the rotors turned or anything, just pads. Never ever had a problem. But, I haven't done this in years. I drove my Nissan Frontier 140k before the brakes went bad. I am not a hard braker.

009
Contributing Member
*********

USA

Jul 2nd, 2018 04:23 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I had my front pads replaced 3 years ago or so. I (now) have a slightly warped rotor. I just discovered that there is a break-in (bed in?) procedure that should be followed, and one of the consequences of not doing so could result in a warped rotor. The pads (the ones made by Power Stop, anyway) are embedded with a resin that gets “treated” thru a heating and cooling effect via specific braking sequences.

K4
Contributing Member
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Being defenseless

does not make you more safe
Jul 2nd, 2018 04:27 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Slacker, sounds like your parking brake is frozen. Very common.

Take it apart and you should be able to clean it up.

slacker
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Hawkeye Country

Thread crapping is unbecoming
Jul 2nd, 2018 06:30 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

K4 - yeah, that was my plan. I need to take a camera to know how to put it back together (and watch a few vids).

Surfinboy
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USA

Practice!
Jul 2nd, 2018 08:33 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Is it me or is that kind of mileage on an original set of brakes unheard of? If so, go 009!

K4
Contributing Member
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Being defenseless

does not make you more safe
Jul 2nd, 2018 10:22 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Not uncommon for rears.

slacker
Contributing Member
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Hawkeye Country

Thread crapping is unbecoming
Jul 9th, 2018 08:48 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I figured I'd come back and fill you in on what our issue was. Remember when I said I was sure I disengaged the parking brake? But I also thought it was acting like the parking brake was engaged?

Well both were true. My son pulled the car into his garage (which was air conditioned) before I got there so it would be cool while we worked on it (heat index the day we started was around 107).

Well, when I got there, we started jacking it up and I thought "oh, better go make sure the parking brake is off" so I went and pulled the little switch to disengage (it's electronically controlled). Well, I use the brake regularly but didn't know that you have to have the brake pressed to disengage the parking brake, so it was never disengaged.

We ended up putting things together with the parking brake components removed, fired up the car and got the brakes pumped up. I then started messing with the parking brake and that was when we figured out what had happened. We ensured it was off, took the problem wheel back apart and reassembled everything. As you'd expect, the rotor went on like a dream.

All is well now, but a series of events and my stupidity cost us a lot of heartache.

FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Need rear brake pads -- Are these pads & rotors OK?




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