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FDP Forum / Fender Guitars: Stratocasters / Signature Strats: Clapton / Johnson / Beck

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60CycleHum

USA

Jun 9th, 2018 09:28 PM   Edit   Profile  

I have the 2nd version of the JB strat...still with lace sensors, thick baseball bat neck..not as thick as first version, lsr nut instead of wilkinson...it's still a great guitar. Would like to have a recent EJ, maybe the thin-line, the first one felt sticky on the neck and seemed like it needed a string tree. Played an early EC and don't like V necks or the stiffness mentioned earlier...might be from the trem blocking

(This message was last edited by 60CycleHum at 11:29 PM, Jun 9th, 2018)

archiestone
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El Californio

Jun 10th, 2018 01:09 AM   Edit   Profile  

'Why do you ask?'
-I own a couple of nice Strats but none MIA at the moment. I played an EJ once and liked it OK but not sure if it's for me. Thought I'd take the temp and see what others thought of the sig models I find most interesting. No real agenda afoot... for now.

Peegoo
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Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 10th, 2018 08:03 AM   Edit   Profile  

The EJ Strat's headstock design is different from other necks. The headstock has more of a setback, and that increases string angle over the nut. The intent was to dispense with the string tree(s) and maintain firm contact between the strings and nut.

That factor is what creates the tighter feel when bending on an EJ Strat.

Viera
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Jun 10th, 2018 08:58 AM   Edit   Profile  

ejm, my comment was mostly tongue in cheek. EJ Strats (originals) might work just fine for how I play.

But I do hold 5Strats' opinions in high regard and Peegoo's explanation makes sense.

5Strats
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Edmond/OKC

GospelBilly!
Jun 12th, 2018 06:21 AM   Edit   Profile  

ejm - I own 7 Strats currently, 4 of which are American Deluxe models. The EJ's just were more difficult to bend strings on, for me at least.

I attribute a lot of this to the maple fretboards and the finish Fender uses on the EJ models. (I know the EJ is also available with a rosewood fretboard but I've never tried one). I prefer rosewood fretboards too, so this also entered into my opinion significantly.

Note - The maple fretboard on my 2017 American Special Strat is a very light satin and plays excellent. It plays better than the Am Dlx V neck Strat I used to own which had a lot more finish on the maple fretboard.

If none of this makes sense, I'm to blame. (:oD

tiller2
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Washington DC

Jun 12th, 2018 08:22 AM   Edit   Profile  

I haven't tried other sig Strats but I like my John Mayer Strat very much--vintage specs, fat C neck, custom pickups that sound vintage-y.

(This message was last edited by tiller2 at 05:22 PM, Jun 12th, 2018)

L. Nedmundo

Philadelphia

Jun 12th, 2018 10:33 AM   Edit   Profile  

I've never tried the Jeff Beck, but I've tried the others. I liked the Clapton a lot, but prefer the Eric Johnson for the 12" fretboard radius if nothing else. All my guitars have the more typical 9.5" radius, but some of my basses have 12" and I've developed a clear preference for flatter fretboards.

I came pretty close to buying a rosewood fretboard Eric Johnson sig at a guitar show a few years ago, but held off and ended up with a G&L Comanche.

I bet the EJ's quartersawn neck contributes to a more stiff feel generally, though maybe not for string bending. A couple of my basses have quartersawn necks, and I definitely feel the difference.

Peegoo
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Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 12th, 2018 01:16 PM   Edit   Profile  

Is that the Fender John Mayer Strat, or the PRS John Mayer Strat?

:^D

tiller2
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Washington DC

Jun 12th, 2018 03:21 PM   Edit   Profile  

Haha. Fender, sir. Not the Super Duper Sky.

Peegoo
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Ooo that sandwich

is gonna get et
Jun 12th, 2018 03:36 PM   Edit   Profile  

I know...just kiddin'.

The Silver Sky was THE topic of discussion and prominently on display at the PRS Experience on Saturday here in MD. It's a very nice guitar.

5Strats
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Edmond/OKC

GospelBilly!
Jun 15th, 2018 06:27 AM   Edit   Profile  

"It's a very nice guitar."

Hush your mouth, that's like talking about SHAFT! (;oD

[right on]

Ricey

US

Jul 8th, 2018 09:27 AM   Edit   Profile  

I think the stiff feel of the EJ is a combination of the quartersawn neck and increased neck angle, but mainly the quartersawn neck. I actually found an article on this once (maybe in Premier Guitar) that claimed that the more stable your neck (a good thing), the harder your strings bend (a bad thing for some). It is because a guitar neck generally flexes a bit when you bend a string. This neck relief is what loosens the string tension. This is similar to why guitars with floating bridges tend to have a slinkier feel when bending. In this case, the bridge gives a little instead of the neck. If you have ever pulled back on your headstock for a pseudo whammy effect on a fixed bridge guitar, you know all about how a guitar neck can flex and bend slightly. It is much harder to get that effect on a guitar with an extremely stable neck. Quartersawn neck are generally more stable than flat sawn.

(This message was last edited by Ricey at 01:50 PM, Jul 8th, 2018)

5Strats
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Edmond/OKC

GospelBilly!
Jul 8th, 2018 02:23 PM   Edit   Profile  

Thanks Ricey!

Ricey

US

Jul 9th, 2018 09:09 AM   Edit   Profile  

Oh, I just remembered something else...the article also recommended a simple method to test your neck stability. Play your open B or open E string, then perform a wide bend on your G string somewhere between frets 7-9. Don't actually pick the G string-just bend it up while picking or plucking the open string. The more the open string drops in pitch, the less stiff your neck and the easier your strings will bend, because this slight neck relief decreases string tension The less the pitch drops, the more stable your neck and the harder it will be to bend strings. Of course, if your neck flexes significantly, you will have to bend your strings ever higher to compensate, so, in the long run, you might be exerting the same total amount of force bending on a slinkier neck as you do on a stiffer neck. The nice thing about a more stable neck is that it will tend to need fewer routine truss rod adjustments. I was thinking that if this article was correct, wouldn't it be possible for a guitar to start bending harder as it ages and the neck wood starts drying out and stiffens? I know that with my guitars, they tend to require fewer routine truss rod adjustments as they get older and settle in. I live in the northeast, so when I buy a new guitar, it usually requires truss rod adjustments every Fall and Spring for a few seasons to set the proper relief as the temperature and humidity changes, but most of my guitars are now several years old and now rarely need an adjustment.

(This message was last edited by Ricey at 11:17 AM, Jul 9th, 2018)

5Strats
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Edmond/OKC

GospelBilly!
Jul 9th, 2018 01:15 PM   Edit   Profile  

I set most of my Strats up with 5 springs and with the trem block (2-point bridges) unable to move. This improves tuning stability and allows you to do faux pedal steel stuff without the strings you're not bending going out of tune. Behind the nut bends are also possible without tuning issues.

I'm just not a whammy bar king, even though I love Jeff Beck, Hendrix and other glorious users and abusers of the bar.

Ricey

US

Jul 9th, 2018 06:53 PM   Edit   Profile  

Yeah, I use trem setters in my Strat, Jackson, and Charvel for the same reason.

5Strats
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Edmond/OKC

GospelBilly!
Jul 10th, 2018 05:33 AM   Edit   Profile  

The funny thing is that the main band I'm playing in currently does all original hard rock, thus no need for any country techniques. But my HSS Strats sound great in this context too.

Ricey

US

Jul 10th, 2018 04:48 PM   Edit   Profile  

I have a WD Trem-Setter in my AmDlx and a Mag-Lok in my Jackson. They both work about the same , but the WD is MUCH easier to install. You have to drill a screw hole in your trem cavity to install the Mag-Lok, which I will NEVER do again. I had a Hip-Shot in a Carvin that I used to own and I think that one worked the best. It had adjustable tension, so you could adjust the amount of counter tension from very stiff to much looser and everything in between. The WD and the Mag-Lock don't hold the bridge perfectly still when you bend, but I can work with the slight pitch drop.

5Strats
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Edmond/OKC

GospelBilly!
Jul 11th, 2018 05:44 AM   Edit   Profile  

I've not heard of the Mag-Lok before, but the Hip-Shot is well known.

Ricey

US

Jul 11th, 2018 05:33 PM   Edit   Profile  

It uses rare earth magnets. The bridge is returned to zero point and held there when not using the bar via strong light-weight magnets. It works well, but you do need to drill one small screw hole in the spring/claw cavity to install it. Neither Hip-Shot nor WD require any permanent mods:

https://www.super-vee.com/products/essentials/mag-lok-anti-deflection-device



(This message was last edited by Ricey at 07:36 PM, Jul 11th, 2018)

Previous 20 Messages   Next 20 Messages  

FDP Forum / Fender Guitars: Stratocasters / Signature Strats: Clapton / Johnson / Beck




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