FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Amplified Parts

MOD KITS DIY

Advertise here

Guitar Center

Sweetwater

Musician's Friend

Jensen Loudspeakers

Apex Tube Matching

WD Music

Antique Electronics Supply


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Home Recording Forum / Sweeping for frequencies during mix

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
******

Florida

pronounced "Klinkhammer" in French
Apr 11th, 2018 01:28 PM   Edit   Profile  

I've been aware of this process for some time but never felt I had the ears to pinpoint truly problematic frequencies. Tighten the Q, boost, sweep. Find a nasty then apply substractive eq. Thing is, are we really finding a problem? Are we hitting it at the right octave? Are we subtracting with the right Q? Are we doing this on every instrument channel, or the buss, or the master buss?

What's your practice?

Juice Nichols
Contributing Member
********

Panama City, FL

I'm just a dude, playing a dude...
Apr 11th, 2018 01:45 PM   Edit   Profile  

Put the Q at minimum width and either boost or cut the frequency about 12db; Depending if I'm trying to remove unwanted frequency or accent a particular frequency. Sweep the frequency range to see where the good and bad are and adjust accordingly. I do this on the particular instrument channel. I've never applied it to a bus; master or otherwise.

Achase4u

U.S. - Virginia

Apr 11th, 2018 01:53 PM   Edit   Profile  

I use two methods of what you describe above. One is usually only when I hear a harmonic that is killing me, and the other is more of general EQ work.

The first one I use for "ringing frequencies" is a pretty high Q method. I use waves q10 for this and it's perfect. The bands can go from .1 to 100 on Q. I think the notch band goes even higher.

Anyway, sometimes on electric guitar or piano, acoustic guitar, those types of instruments, a frequency/harmonic can be very very loud. This seems to happen on instruments with strings. Not so much on voices or horns, to my ear. Some specific guitars and such are worse than others, and mic placement can hurt you too.

However, when all that is said and done and it's mix time, you work with what you've got. Usually I hear those frequencies that ring almost too easily. They really stick out to me. I have no idea why because most people don't hear them and my hearing is pretty battered already at 34. My last test was not pretty.

So what I do mentally is sing the harmonic. You can almost always related it to a pitch that is being played. So you may hear it as a 5th or minor 3rd etc. Then put your narrow Q band on and boost the crap out of it. Move it up until you start getting close to your pitch. Once you get close you'll know. Once you nail it you'll REALLY know, because it'll ring LOUDLY. A chart of all the pitches and their respective frequencies can really help as well.

The second kind is more of a "taste" EQ thing. It's usually best to EQ with all instruments going. Solo is a pitfall for EQ most of the time. Hunt for certain sounds in solo but I would recommend EQing in context because that's what matters. Too much low mid on the bass? Push up around 150 to 300 hz until what you don't like becomes louder, then pull it out some. Need a certain sparkle on acoustic guitar? Push up from 5 to 16k area until you find what you like.

Piece o cake.

I usually do very little on the master bus. If I do, it's a very transparent EQ usually and no more than 1db in any direction. Usually more like a half db. Somethings there is just a lot of buildup in 500hz, so I'll pull some out. Maybe it needs a little 12k shelf for air etc. All depends on what you like to do and the sounds you want in the end.

For Master bus EQ check out Plugin Alliances Dangerous Bax eq. Some guys can't tell it from the hardware. Very famous master bus EQ. Gentle and effective.

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
******

Florida

pronounced "Klinkhammer" in French
Apr 11th, 2018 01:53 PM   Edit   Profile  

Have you ever noticed that if you find something bad at say 800hZ, there is likely similar funk at 400, then 200hZ?

Achase4u

U.S. - Virginia

Apr 11th, 2018 01:59 PM   Edit   Profile  

"Have you ever noticed that if you find something bad at say 800hZ, there is likely similar funk at 400, then 200hZ?"

That usually doesn't happen to me in the lows like that unless we're talking electric hum and it's harmonics. It does sometimes happen with ringing in the mid/upper mids. However I've found that's usually because of a not so great mic or instrument. Though it happens. I usually try to re track if it's that bad.

reverendrob
FDP Data Goon
Moderator

We all want

our time in hell
Apr 11th, 2018 09:25 PM   Edit   Profile  

I've always just done it by ear, but it's how I learned to mix and master stuff.

Leftee
Contributing Member
**********
**********
*

VA

Apr 12th, 2018 05:22 AM   Edit   Profile  

I don’t sweep for frequencies. But I do brake for dust bunnies.

rockstar_not

USA

Thank God for guitars!
Jul 16th, 2018 05:59 PM   Edit   Profile  

To find wonky frequencies boost a narrow band then flip it to cut. When boosting for some missing content the bandwidth should be pretty wide to keep it natural sounding. Very few tonal instruments have a tight resonance and those that do should be easy to capture with a mic.

Leftee
Contributing Member
**********
**********
********

VA

Jul 16th, 2018 06:02 PM   Edit   Profile  

I thought I’d killed this thread.

Achase4u
Contributing Member
********

U.S. - Virginia

Jul 17th, 2018 11:12 AM   Edit   Profile  

Zombie thread! Zombie thread!

ninworks
Contributing Member
*******

Tennessee

Too Much GAS
Jul 17th, 2018 01:16 PM   Edit   Profile  

"Have you ever noticed that if you find something bad at say 800hZ, there is likely similar funk at 400, then 200hZ?"

Ubetchya. Sometimes there is ugliness above the fundamental too. 1600Hz for instance. I have even had instances where say, there's a problem around 400Hz. Cut 200 and see what happens. It depends upon what other sounds are in the 200 range. Sometimes it helps to open up a hole for something else. Bass guitar for instance.

I myself and 200 to 250Hz are not usually on speaking terms. That's where a lot of the mud lives. If something is going to occupy that range that had better be where its fundamental lives or it's outa here.

As far as I'm concerned, whatever works, works!

FDP Forum / Home Recording Forum / Sweeping for frequencies during mix




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2018 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved