FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

WD Music

Amazon

MOD KITS DIY

Musician's Friend

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Sweetwater

Antique Electronics Supply

Amplified Parts

Apex Tube Matching

Guitar Center

Jensen Loudspeakers


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Today's installment of Helpful Advice for Criminals

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

Curled up

in the fecal position
Dec 27th, 2017 03:03 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

The latest in the continuing series of threads designed to assist aspiring hooligans, scofflaws and malefactors to advance their careers.

Now then: if you're following your intended victim and they pull into a police station parking lot, call it a day and go get a sandwich or something.

Can you spot what they did wrong?

K4
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**

Being defenseless

does not make you more safe
Dec 27th, 2017 03:33 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Around here the police stations are locked up tighter than Ft.Knox. No way could any one run inside to avoid a robbery.

MJB
Contributing Member
**********
**

Who's we sucka?

Smith, Wesson and me.
Dec 27th, 2017 04:08 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Idjits.

mfitz804
Contributing Member
**********
**********
***

Staten Island, NY

Our resident rational liberal
Dec 27th, 2017 09:33 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

A friend’s son and some friends of his were robbed and beaten 3 houses down from the local precinct. One escaped and ran to the police station, told a cop standing outside smoking that the crime was in progress, and he told him to go inside and file a report.

Unfortunately, this is typical of our local precinct, which is well known to be one of the easiest gigs in the NYPD. They would much rather be passing out traffic violations than actually enforcing the law.

argo
Contributing Member
**********
**

Michigan

Get out of the line, climb the stairs.
Dec 27th, 2017 10:03 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

In other news "Man defends himself and goes to jail"

Adding: I made that up.

(This message was last edited by argo at 12:05 AM, Dec 28th, 2017)

RicOkc

Nicoma Park, OK.

"Let the music do the talking"
Dec 28th, 2017 02:23 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

It's amazing what some criminals do considering that there are cameras just about everywhere.

MJB
Contributing Member
**********
**

Who's we sucka?

Smith, Wesson and me.
Dec 28th, 2017 05:40 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Painfully obvious that you cannot count on the police to protect you.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

Curled up

in the fecal position
Dec 28th, 2017 06:18 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

That is true--for a reason.

Despite the "To serve and Protect" slogans you see on their cruisers, police are in no way obligated to protect anyone from anybody else.

It's a widely-held misconception that police are supposed to protect the public.

Their job is to enforce the law.

Gato
Contributing Member
**********
*******

Southern Calif

Dec 28th, 2017 06:54 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Times have certainly changed. When I was a young pup LEO on the street (beginning in 1974) my colleagues and I were hard chargers, zinging from one call to the next, as if in a life sized pin ball machine. There weren't enough hours in the shift to get the job done.

Pursuits, fights with drunks and druggies, being referees at family squabbles, assisting family services personnel, parole officers, animal control officers, prying people out of car wreckage, making premises checks at topless bars (hey ... somebody had to do it!), writing reams of paper, spending days off in court .....

I sure wouldn't want to be a street cop today.
What was for me a fulfilling, exciting profession has become a minefield.
Anything an officer does is scrutinized under a microscope.

Imagine being a player on a baseball team where each side has its own umpire ... no matter what you do, either one side or the other says you did it wrong. No wonder there's cynicism from both the officers and the public.

And because it is such a thankless, trying job now, it's getting harder to find qualified people to fill the ranks. Inevitably, bottom-of-the-barrel recruits are snapped up by agencies who discover (surprise!) that unsuitable officers do really stupid things that not only endanger the public, but cost the taxpayers millions in awards from lawsuits.

I'm grateful to be watching from the sidelines now, having lunch with other old timers, while we share stories of the latest blunder by this or that law enforcement agency.

buster strings
Contributing Member
****

Kentucky

Rafe Hollister is a friend of mine
Dec 28th, 2017 07:13 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I must be lucky. If that happened in my town, 12 cops would be on the would-be robbers in seconds.
Back during the recession, we called the police after seeing some kids climb through the window of a foreclosed home a couple of houses down. In less than two minutes there were six cruisers surrounding the place.

Ragtop
Contributing Member
**********
******

The older the violin

the sweeter the music.
Dec 28th, 2017 07:50 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"I sure wouldn't want to be a street cop today."

No kidding, me neither. Gato, you and I were lucky enough to do the job during what I call the "golden age of law enforcement." The pay and benefits were pretty decent if you were able to catch on with the right department, and you were still able to use common sense and your own discretion on the street.

This was all changing when I retired in 2010. I couldn't operate these days.

AlohaEd

Glendale, NY

Eddie
Dec 28th, 2017 09:30 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"Unfortunately, this is typical of our local precinct, which is well known to be one of the easiest gigs in the NYPD. They would much rather be passing out traffic violations than actually enforcing the law."

I can say the same for my precinct here in Glendale, Ridgewood, Middle Village, Maspeth. You call 311, it takes them forever to show up, IF they show up at all. And many times, call 911, it takes them hours to arrive.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

Curled up

in the fecal position
Dec 30th, 2017 08:44 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

It would be hard for me to be a cop.

Everyone is armed, and all too often the cops cannot separate the good guys from the bad guys until after the shooting stops.

The big problem (as I see it) is people feel they need the means to protect themselves because the police can't/won't do it.

If protecting yourself and your family includes arming yourself, do so--and get some training because you need it.

Many states evade liability by relying on the ironically-named "public duty" doctrine, which says police are duty-bound to protect the public in general, but not to protect any particular individual. "Protecting the public" means enforcing the law, not protecting the individual.

Likewise, the general rule of law in the U.S. is that government is obligated to protect the public in general, but owes no statutory duty to protect any particular person from criminal behavior. Neither the U.S. Constitution nor federal civil rights laws require states to protect citizens from crime. As a federal appeals court (in Brazier v. Cherry, 293 F.2d 401, 404-05, 5th Cir. 1961) bluntly put it, ordinary citizens have "no constitutional right to be protected by the state against being murdered by criminals or madmen." This opinion has held since then, despite several challenges over the years.

In light of this, all we ask is that states and the federal government allow us to protect ourselves from armed criminals or madmen. And not with pepper spray and a telephone. There's only one 'best way' to stop a bad guy that has a gun.

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
******

Florida

Dec 30th, 2017 08:57 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

IMO, anyone taking a LE job these days for under, say, $100k/year should be under suspicion. Contempt, targeting, drudgery, exposure to the cesspoolian life...no thanks.

Viera
Contributing Member
**********
**********

Santee CA

I forgot my tagline
Dec 30th, 2017 09:31 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Good stuff there Peegoo. I would guess that the majority of American adults are not aware of the liability/duty items you noted.

Just speaking for myself and in defense of LEs in general, I would never ever expect someone to risk their life to save mine, regardless of what oaths may have been taken.

Which goes right along with what you stated in your last paragraph.

littleuch, San Diego recently jacked up the pay for LEs in order to compete with other municipalities throughout the country, and yes, the base pay is well over $100k/year. This a trend that likely won't end soon.



Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

Curled up

in the fecal position
Dec 30th, 2017 10:39 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Cheers, Viera, I am right there with you on this stuff.

A firearm for personal protection is no different (to me) than a decent fire extinguisher.

A fire extinguisher provides practical course of action in the event a person needs it to protect themselves and their family & friends from the danger of a fire--at least until the professionals show up.

Which reminds me: if you keep a fire extinguisher in your kitchen, the cabinet under the sink is a bad place to store it--especially if the sink is next to the stove.

You want the extinguisher behind you, like near the kitchen door. That way if you're cooking you can step back, grab the extinguisher and activate it, and hose things down. Or if you need to enter the kitchen to extinguish a fire, you grab it on the way in.

Be safe in 2018, y'all,

FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Today's installment of Helpful Advice for Criminals




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2018 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved