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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / How do you know when it's time for a new job or line of work?

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Steve M
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USA

Nov 8th, 2017 08:32 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Prof,

Not adjunct, full time multi year renewable contracts. 4/4 load @ 70% of the pay for a PhD with a /2 load

TheProfessor
Contributing Member
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MI

After 30 years, I should play better.
Nov 8th, 2017 09:04 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Sorry -- however, no tenure option, correct?

(fixed term and adjunct are often used interchangeably around here)

littleuch
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Florida

I'm not as clever as my dog thinks
Nov 8th, 2017 09:05 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

On a much lower non-academic scale I spent my entire working career embracing the "devil you know" analogy. But then there's the "boiled frog" syndrome. You put a frog in a pot of boiling water and he'll jump right out. Put one in a pot of cool water and slowly increase the temperature for a long period of time, he'll boil to death.

(This message was last edited by littleuch at 11:06 AM, Nov 8th, 2017)

professor
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North Gnarlyington

Nov 8th, 2017 09:22 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Steve M, I'm 30+ years at a nearby school, last 25 as full time, now in a 3 year exit plan. Circumstances are different, but I know that academic cultures can be stuck for two main reasons, money and people/personalities. The smaller the school the less turnover, the less shifting of departmental dynamics and attitudes..until someone retires, is fired, leaves, or dies. You could walk in tomorrow and somebody may be gone which could totally alter the whole environment. I've seen it happen and have been the beneficiary of such shifts.

In your situation, at your age, I'd probably think of several options short of chucking it. One would be to look for other short part term gigs in addition to your main one, as there are many schools within the region and departments always experience some sort of crisis/need that at the last minute someone has to fill. You never know what will lead to something. Also, students do vary depending on the institution.

Similar to that you could propose classes for schools that have a continuing education component. Again, a change of pace, scenery, culture, and students.

Another option which can be available is some kind of shift to the administrative side of things, and not necessarily at your current school. Because of your expertise something in the finance/business office or the facilities department, they're more nuts and bolts, but rarely do they have people who have had a direct expereince in the academic side which could be a real selling point.

Of course, that option is going over to the dark side...and goodbye summer!

(This message was last edited by professor at 11:28 AM, Nov 8th, 2017)

mfitz804
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Staten Island, NY

Our resident rational liberal
Nov 8th, 2017 09:38 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"What's funny is that now, at 67, I wonder what I want to do next. I don't need to work but my wife wants to work for three more years until she's 65 and can get Medicare and her full pension. So I need to keep doing *something* for a few more years."

Professional shaving consultant.

Steve M
Contributing Member
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USA

Nov 8th, 2017 09:44 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Prof,

I've learned that small schools with low turnover are REALLY small and set in their ways.

Adjuncting somewhere else is economically unjustifiable at the going rate per course vs. my experience.

I may be chasing an academic unicorn, but I'd like to find a place where I can teach and be a colleague in a less maddening culture.

professor
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North Gnarlyington

Nov 8th, 2017 09:45 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

^ LifeStyle Quality™ Consultant (replying to mfitz)

(This message was last edited by professor at 11:46 AM, Nov 8th, 2017)

larryguitar19
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*****

South Florida

larryguitar
Nov 8th, 2017 09:53 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Littleuch wrote:

"You put a frog in a pot of boiling water and he'll jump right out. Put one in a pot of cool water and slowly increase the temperature for a long period of time, he'll boil to death."

You know you're describing a typical marriage- Right?

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
Nov 8th, 2017 09:59 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Just like most all other aspects of Life.

You weigh the good

and

You weigh the bad.

When the bad out-weighs the good you should recognize that something might need to change.

It's always worked for me.

That's about all I got.

(This message was last edited by BlondeStrat at 11:59 AM, Nov 8th, 2017)

Therealfrogman
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Pueblo, Co

illegal is a sick bird....
Nov 8th, 2017 10:31 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

The way I see things...If you aren't excited about going to work then you are in the wrong field.



BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
Nov 8th, 2017 11:35 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I don't find myself "excited" to go to work an hardly any day ... going back to when I was 15 years old.

That would be 45 years. ;)

Tom B.

OK

Nov 8th, 2017 11:51 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"So how do you know when it's time to go?
And how do you know when it's time to just move the show to a new arena, or move on to a different "show" entirely?"

You will know at some point. I left a tenured academic postion at a comprehensive State U about 16 yrs ago. I miss the students, but I do not miss the downsides to academics one bit. Since then I've been blessed with a good job at a good A/E company, practicing what I used to teach, and love it. At my age and career stage, there are still lots of opportunity to teach/mentor, it's just done at work now. My impressions are that the Construction Industry is still a place where lots of money can be made (or lost), but money is not everything. Hope you find what you're looking for.

Hammond101
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So. Cal. USA

Nov 8th, 2017 12:35 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I guess you just know as said above. The bad outweighs the good and it's time to move on. I've only done this once and that was in 1979! I had to better myself and apply my skills to a position that would adequately compensate me for my time.

I'm at a crossroads now as greed has crept into the firm I work for now and things are not as they once were. I've been here nearly 31 years. I have a contract that I must complete to receive my retirement so I'm a bit stuck until that time has passed. Only about a year more then I can move on or retire if I choose to. Retirement income and health insurance both play into it. I could leave here in a year or so and finish up my working years elsewhere or stay knowing I could walk at a moments notice. At 61 I have some options, good health and skills in the music repair and performance business that can supplement my exit if needed.

It's difficult and I felt the same as you when I was 57. In my industry not many want to hire someone of that age and pay a salary worth my knowledge and experience. What I do is also quite specialized and there aren't many companies that do what I do nationally. If it happens a change of industry would most likely be the result.

bongo122819

usa

All I need is one more guitar
Nov 8th, 2017 01:35 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My experience is a bit different - I've been at the same Firm for 45 years !
I've often pondered the "boiled frog" syndrome but frankly I enjoy my work here and the convenience of a short commute, close to family, enough free time for music , etc.
I'll retire from here when my gut tells me and enjoy the free time bass fishing and playing guitar until something in my gut tells me to try something else. YMMV

BobbyMac
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California Escapee

Don't look at me with that tone of voice
Nov 8th, 2017 02:05 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"How do you know when it's time for a new job or line of work?"

Sounds like you are nearly there. The trick is to get the next gig (or retirement) lined up or in sight before you HAVE to make the move.

Good luck!



BbendFender
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American Patriot

About as ordinary as you can get.
Nov 8th, 2017 02:17 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I know teaching at the college level is not what it used to be. That's what I hear.
If you feel in your heart that you need a change then I would change. I changed careers at ago 41 and never regretted. Comfortably retired now.

FlyonNylon
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East Tennessee

Nov 8th, 2017 04:32 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I spent way too much time and money on school to change jobs anytime in the next 15 years, but can definitely see a point when the nights/weekends/holidays are intolerable and financially can transition to a more normal schedule.

The key though is not letting your desire for change impede your retirement goals. I have unfortunately witnessed a few people in their 50s quit their profession without a clear transition plan in place, and the result may be delaying retirement due to lack of income. Kind of counter productive.

I would be careful quitting a "sure thing" if you are less than 10 years from retirement and don't have a guaranteed source of income, unless you don't mind being in limbo for a few years and subsequently retiring later. Of course this is all personal and none of it may apply to the OPs situation.

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
Nov 8th, 2017 05:48 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I am actually in this mode myself.

I've come to the conclusion that it's time for a change. Multiple reasons which all revolve around my previous mentioned assessment method ...

*Weigh the good, Weigh the bad*.

I have come to like a side perspective on my situation. It goes as follows:

I spent 20 years growing to adulthood

I spent 20 years in Retail Management

I've now spent 20 years as a small business Owner/Operator.

It's now time begin my next 20 years.


BobbyMac
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California Escapee

Don't look at me with that tone of voice
Nov 8th, 2017 05:55 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I spent 27 years growing into adulthood.

I spent the next 27 years in law enforcement.

Now if I can just get 27 years into retirement (12 so far), I'll be a lucky dude.

Peegoo
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Enjoying

the downtime
Nov 8th, 2017 06:04 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I just went through this meself.

Several jobs as a young buck, 21 years in the Air Force, followed by 14 years as a federal contractor.

We were re-competing for our contract (five-year term with one-year options); the new contract would begin on 1 October.

The agency that was our customer is quite dysfunctional in their contracting office, so notifications, etc., are always late.

I was notified on a Saturday night (30 Sept) that my company was not awarded the contract--a competitor was.

So I had to make phone calls to 20 people on Sunday morning to let them know they had no job beginning *tomorrow* (2 October). I cannot tell you how difficult that was for me to do.

Everyone including the federal team we supported was expecting we'd be awarded the contract, just like we have through the past few re-competes. But this is one of the big risks of being a...mercenary, and we all know it.

I've saved my $$ and invested smartly, so I'm in no hurry to go back to work. But I'm not 60 yet, and I still have enough fire in my belly to keep killing bad guys. So I'll probably jump back into the game after the holidays.

This is the first time I've been officially unemployed since I was 14 1/2 years old. I've been working straight through since then.

And I'm really enjoying the downtime like it says under those stars on the left.

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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / How do you know when it's time for a new job or line of work?




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