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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / Wood guys - planer question

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Ryder
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Northwest Missouri

Butterscotch Blues
Sep 25th, 2017 03:03 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I have several boards glued together edgewise, all grain going the same direction...except, one board that goes across.

If I run this through the planer will it have a tendency to tear out some on the cross piece?

I don't really have to plane it, I just wanted to.

Light passes?

Thanks

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
Sep 25th, 2017 03:13 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Maybe ...

Sharp blades and high RPM will be your friend on that one.

Edited to add: Type of wood (tightness of grain) would make a difference as well

(This message was last edited by BlondeStrat at 05:14 PM, Sep 25th, 2017)

NoSoapRadio
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Mass., Amerika

CO2 ... is there anything it can't do?
Sep 25th, 2017 03:22 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I'm not following -- are you sure the single board is across the grain rather than against the grain?

Ryder
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Northwest Missouri

Butterscotch Blues
Sep 25th, 2017 03:51 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

The cross piece is grain running perpendicular to the other boards.

Ryder
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Northwest Missouri

Butterscotch Blues
Sep 25th, 2017 03:53 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Think of a cross with boards all around it, above and below the cross pice of the cross. All of the other boards run perpendicular to the cross piece.

I'm going to try it anyway, light pass, and finished speed.

(This message was last edited by Ryder at 05:55 PM, Sep 25th, 2017)

jhawkr
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Wichita, KS USA

It's all gravy from here on...
Sep 25th, 2017 03:59 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

And, a jitterbug sander will be your friend with grain going every which-way!

Peegoo
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Deus

ex Machina
Sep 25th, 2017 04:03 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

A thickness sander is way less risky. However!

The type of wood you have there matters:

Softer woods like pine, etc., plane pretty nicely across the grain if the blades are sharp.

Harder woods like Walnut (especially figured-grain hard woods) can tear out, even with sharp blades.

Bottom line: use a high cutter speed and a very slow feed speed, and take very thin passes--and you will probably be okay if the wood is not too hard or figured.

Cal-Woody

USA/California

Why do I keep fixing things that work?
Sep 25th, 2017 05:18 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Or use a drum sander style planer, like the DeWalt brand.
Remember to always run your wood cupped side down on any planer that you use.
Most planers have a tension roller that is adjusted to help with feeding/traction to the drive belt or roller that feeds the cutting head. These however only go up to @ 16".
Your best bet is to take the wood down to the wood mill where they can run a whole table top through in one pass but most shops/mills will take the wood down to where there is the least amount of dings or warp, depending upon your desire, then the light depressions can be swelled up with using a damp paper towel and a clothes iron to raise the divits for finish sanding.

jefe46
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State of Jefferson

Sep 25th, 2017 06:17 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

drum sander


Ryder
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Northwest Missouri

Butterscotch Blues
Sep 26th, 2017 06:33 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Don't have a thickness or drum sander.

Walnut cross piece...poplar is the wood around the walnut.

jefe46
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State of Jefferson

Sep 26th, 2017 06:46 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Take into consideration the grain and density of each..
Walnut is more likely to shred... poplar is relatively homogenous.

Is the walnut board the odd man out.?


Also how large is this glue up ?

(This message was last edited by jefe46 at 07:19 PM, Sep 27th, 2017)

SS2

Alexandria, Virginia

Sep 26th, 2017 08:46 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"Don't have a thickness or drum sander."

Well, then you don't have a choice ;^)... I take it you have a 12-13" $400 +/- planer, give it a try, I would. I don't find walnut to be that terribly hard of wood, certainly not as hard as rock maple or cherry.

Pass it through slow taking a very shallow cut and see how it does. Have SHARP knives on the planer. I've planed through knots (and that's end grain without terrible results). You're likely to get a little snipe at each end anything.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Sep 26th, 2017 09:55 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Another option would be to use a router, but it would require jigs/fixtures. You won't get the chipout that you may get with a planer, but you also won't get as smooth a finish. Sanding required.

Ryder
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Northwest Missouri

Butterscotch Blues
Sep 26th, 2017 01:48 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

SS2, that’s the idea. I have a dewalt 535. 13 inches I believe.

I’ll post a picture as I’m getting it close. It’s very rough.

About 3 years ago, my b-I-law, the collector (hoarder) dropped off 3 walnut boards he’d found in a scrap pile. They were about 6x8x1/2. Rough cut, cracks, just not good.

Eventually, I started sawing it up and got all of the good out of it. My common width became two inches, and the longest pieces were approx. 18. Then I started laminating them for thickness, one inch. Some were two short for the planer so they are mostly thicker.

(This message was last edited by Ryder at 06:24 PM, Sep 26th, 2017)

SS2

Alexandria, Virginia

Sep 26th, 2017 02:38 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Ryder, IMO a 535 is a darn great home/small shop planer... give it a try and run it through.

Ryder
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Northwest Missouri

Butterscotch Blues
Sep 26th, 2017 04:23 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Yes, I really like this planer.

The glue up is not quite done yet, but I have a photo now. The two red ended clamps are only there so I could prop it up for gluing.

This is "religious" in nature so I won't explain it. It's an artistic statement from me.

glue up

Ryder
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Northwest Missouri

Butterscotch Blues
Sep 27th, 2017 01:24 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

It worked...with only a small tear out on the walnut square piece on one side of the cross piece.

Thanks everyone for comments and advice.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Sep 27th, 2017 02:12 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I should offer a word of warning that gluing together pieces of wood with the grain running perpendicular to one another is problematical, and a major no-no in furniture design and construction.

Reason is that, with changes in humidity, wood expands much more in the radial and tangential directions than in the logitudinal direction. The problem can be exacerbated if the joint involves woods of different species.

If the finished piece is in an environment where the humidity is near constant, it may be okay, but don't be surprised if that particular glue joint cracks and opens up in time.

NoSoapRadio
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Mass., Amerika

CO2 ... is there anything it can't do?
Sep 27th, 2017 03:19 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Yeah, that was my first reaction -- but I assumed the OP used biscuits, dowels, or dominoes in the joints.

I didn't want to complicate the discussion since the glue up was already done.


jefe46
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State of Jefferson

Sep 27th, 2017 05:23 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

cross grain glue - ups are problematic.


Next time you get there... send it to me.. I'll do it and accept the consequences : )


Next time you do a glue up like this..
Glue sacrificial pieces to the ends with a layer of brown paper and the glue thinned 50/50 with water..

They will be the buffer and also prevent tear out and take the brunt of the snipe.

Pop them off when completed.

Good Job !!




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