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FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / stay at home moms

Roly
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Whitehorse Canada

I don't get out much
Sep 22nd, 2017 01:40 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

When I was young, only dads made money.

Moms held the fort, and they did a terrific job.
Things were organised, clothes were clean and repaired when needed.
Grub was the best I have ever eaten.
No BS was tolerated.
Kids did what was asked of them.

I'll keep it brief.

Anyone have a similar experience?

davywhizz
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Redesdale UK

"Still Alive And Well"
Sep 22nd, 2017 05:16 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My mother always worked (as a community nurse or midwife) as well as dad, though he was ill for a lot of my childhood and died when I was 18 after retiring on health grounds the year before. Otherwise it was pretty much as you describe Roly, despite the pressures. It was a simpler world back then, and better in many ways. And remember how much harder it was to keep those clothes clean with the technology we had then?

Charlie Macon
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Austin, Texas

Yeeeehaaaa!
Sep 22nd, 2017 05:28 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My Mom was stay at home until both of my brothers were in college at the same time, then she went to work.....leaving me at home to have more teen hellion experiences.

Other than a few seasonal employment sessions and "Mother's Day Out" work in the 1990s, my wife has been stay at home.

goldminer
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NC

Invisible 7-11
Sep 22nd, 2017 06:00 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Yep, sounds like we grew up in the same house. There were plenty of other Moms in the neighborhood that were the same.

Man, talk about 'no BS tolerated' ... the Moms' network was faster than the fastest cell phone/internet connection today. Step out of line in your buddy's backyard and your own Mom was coming over the hill before you'd finished laughing at your own stunt. Mom carrying a switch or flyswatter, my partners in crime scattering like ants. Whip my butt then later feed me, tuck me in bed at night and tell me she loved me.

Once her four kids were grown she decided to go back to school to be a nurse. She got her LPN nursing degree, then re-enlisted to get her RN. Worked at the hospital for several years in the newborn baby section. She had a great way with babies and kids.

(This message was last edited by goldminer at 08:01 AM, Sep 22nd, 2017)

jhawkr
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Wichita, KS USA

It's all gravy from here on...
Sep 22nd, 2017 06:00 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My wife has been a stay-at-home grandma for 8 years now.

Jake
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West Chester PA

Wait, what?
Sep 22nd, 2017 06:14 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Mom was an RN and worked part time as we got older.

MJB
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Who's we sucka?

Smith, Wesson and me.
Sep 22nd, 2017 06:17 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Pretty much the experience of most Boomers I would guess. Of course most families had one car, a house with one bathroom and no costly college tuition (compared to today).

mfitz804
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Staten Island, NY

Godzilla the Thread Killa
Sep 22nd, 2017 08:01 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My mom went back to teaching as a sub when I reached school age, and full time shortly after I was 10. I don’t really have any memory of her being a “stay at home”, but since I was in school too, she was home when I was home.

Stratmanx
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Memphis, TN

Sep 22nd, 2017 08:31 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Same here.

The only time my Mom started working was when my Dad passed in 1972 when I was 12.

Strong family values, something that is sorely needed in this day and age.



Taildragger
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USA

"toxic masculinity personified"
Sep 22nd, 2017 08:56 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My mother worked while my dad was overseas during WWII, but never again after he got back.

My wife gave up her small business when we had kids (well, SHE had 'em, I was just in the room) and stayed at home with them while I worked. 4 people on one income meant that we didn't have an opulent lifestyle, but the kids turned out well, so it was worth living without a ton of discretionary spending. My wife did a great job and I like to think that I made a good team partner: she being the "nurturer" and me the disciplinarian. My days off were mid-week, so I was able to actively participate in the kids' school and extra-curricular activities even though I worked full time and often overtime.

In my experience, a lot of the single moms and families wherein both parents worked full time ended up having trouble with the kids. Not all, but many.

littleuch
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Florida

Sep 22nd, 2017 08:57 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

We had a little bit of a different dynamic. My mom worked part time (usually afternoon to evenings) but my grandmother lived with us. So it really was a "2-mom" situation. Granny was an extension of my parents from before I was born until she passed away at 94.

johnny1111
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Maplewood, MN

Sep 22nd, 2017 09:00 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My dad and mom started an asphalt selling business in NW Wisconsin. Dad negotiated with the refinery for a per gallon price of that dirty sludge and called on the county road commissioners to let a bid in the spring. During the summer, both handled the phones for daily load orders for the following day. Mom typed up daily correspondence and billing invoices for mailing as well as set up transportation to truck the hot asphalt to the counties each day. Dad usually was on the road each summer weekday checking with road crews to make sure product was delivered on time at the correct location. So I had the best of both worlds. A working mom in house to keep me in toe and well fed. One minus--mom could not transport me around during summer. They hired young housekeepers for that task, which was not so bad. The business was a 50/50 split. And a very good business it was.

rok-a-bill-e
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Nashville,USA

Clawhammer Rules!
Sep 22nd, 2017 09:11 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My Grandmother lived with us and filled the stay-at-home-mom function, to the max! My Mom always worked part time, yet somehow managed to always be a Room Mother in elementary school and Cub Scout Den Mother, etc.
My boyhood was somewhere between Opie and The Beaver.

Hammond101
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So. Cal. USA

Sep 22nd, 2017 10:03 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Mom was always at home for us, my sister and I. She did get a part time job once I was old enough to be at home for a half hour or so by myself before she returned from work. 4th grade of so. I watched my younger sister. It was a good balance and it taught responsibility at a young age. No BS was tolerated, doors remained locked, no visitors etc. We did not answer the door or phone when alone. Mom would call and check to see if we answered. We also had a code so we would know it was her or dad when alone. Two rings then hang up, then they would call back.

She cooked the meals washed and mended the clothing and kept a tidy household. We were expected to do our chores and we did if we expected any perks in return. Everyone was a family member and contributed to the home. At 12 or so we washed our own cloths. We were always responsible for cleaning our rooms (I was better at this than my sis) I mowed the lawn weekly, twice a week in the big growing season, weeded the garden, washed the car (yes, only one until I began driving) and at about 14 did all of Dad's oil changes and tune ups. My Mom took up driving when I did. So she walked to work, we rode busses and took the taxi to the store when we were young.

I can remember sitting on the floor in my room with a hat pin picking the lint out of the cracks of the maple hardwood flooring. Mom liked things clean.

Dad was the homework helper in math. The stuff he could do in his head amazed me, still does but he showed me how to do it. Mom helped with the artsy stuff.

The perks were total support of my musical interests and Schwinn bicycles. Mom was a den mother, later Dad helped with our scout troop. Dad worked six days a week and Sunday's were his. No church unless it was a holiday, he was a fisherman and so was I. We fished together every Sunday in season except Mother's Day and Easter.

I don't get where the entitlement came from in today's youth. I began to see it when I was in high school and worked as a camp counselor for six 6th graders. Schools began to change and so did parenting styles. Buy them stuff to shut them up I guess. We read books, rode our bikes, built tree forts, made go-karts out of baby coach wheels and wood scraps. We play ball in the back yard and Mom would make Kool-Aid and sandwiches for us. Black, white, brown, yellow, red, we were all the same.

Nice to re-visit these thoughts. Thanks for the thread Roly. I had a great childhood that I am very thankful for. We didn't have much, more than some, less than most but we had each other. Love you Mom, Dad & Sister!

JAFO
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Hemet, SoCal

I detect the El Supremo
Sep 22nd, 2017 10:23 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My Mom was your typical June Cleaver stay at home mom. We'd come home from school, did our homework, and then go out to play. We didn't have a TV for several years and would sit at the dinner table, eat, and would even talk to each other. Dad was in the Navy but was away, overseas a lot when we were young.

All in all, I have great childhood memories.

FDP Forum / Moe's Tavern (_8^(I) / stay at home moms




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