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FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Hex nut wrenches for Strat saddles

RKSTRAT
Contributing Member
**********
***

USA

"Clapton is Good"
Aug 13th, 2017 09:22 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I play Clapton Strats and I don't want to break into case candy
for extra saddle wrenches. I was surprised not to
find them on MF or Amazon. Can anyone recommend a source?

FunkyKikuchiyo

VT

Aug 13th, 2017 09:28 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You can get them, you just need to know how to search. Look for a .05" allen key/hex wrench and you'll find many options.

This will work for nearly everything US that uses the hex head.

Amazon

JJuran
Contributing Member
******

Boston Area

Aug 13th, 2017 09:37 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

ALLPARTS

right here

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
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Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Aug 14th, 2017 12:49 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Aren't the Clapton Strats Imperial 1/16"?
(0.0625")

(This message was last edited by Mick Reid at 02:52 AM, Aug 14th, 2017)

RKSTRAT
Contributing Member
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USA

"Clapton is Good"
Aug 14th, 2017 08:08 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks Mick, you know, I am not sure.

They have a vintage bridge. I will investigate further.

RKSTRAT
Contributing Member
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USA

"Clapton is Good"
Aug 14th, 2017 08:17 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I just found the part number for the Clapton bridge hex nut wrench from the parts list. It is part # 0018531000, which is the .05.

Thanks Mick for pointing out the possibility.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Aug 14th, 2017 01:19 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Put these (link) in your tool box and you'll be set for just about every truss rod or saddle adjustment you're ever likely to encounter on any guitar or bass.

click

RKSTRAT
Contributing Member
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USA

"Clapton is Good"
Aug 14th, 2017 04:20 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks Te 52

I have similar sets. I just wanted a handful of .05" hex to leave in various locations. Upstairs, gig-bag, work area, living room.
It ends up that I tweak the saddles almost weekly, but I only have one wrench! It is probably a bit worn!

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
***

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Aug 14th, 2017 04:31 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"It ends up that I tweak the saddles almost weekly..."

May I ask why?
The saddle heights shouldn't be moving on their own that frequently.
I have guitars that haven't had (or needed) a saddle adjustment in years even after multiple string changes.


Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Aug 14th, 2017 04:43 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"...I just wanted a handful of .05" hex to leave in various locations. Upstairs, gig-bag, work area, living room..."

In that case, how about...

...this?

FunkyKikuchiyo

VT

Aug 14th, 2017 05:04 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Your saddles are probably shaking down from vibration, or just time. It isn't rare on the stamped saddles since there isn't a lot of meat to the threads in the saddle itself. A tell tale sign of this (usually) is that the saddles end up sideways with one side having fallen down much more than the other.

You can try the clear nail polish trick. Set it up how you want it, and with a toothpick (or other fine application device, the supplied brush will be too much) put just a spot onto the threads of the screw, hopefully going down into the saddle threads.

The most commonly suggested method is lacquer, but no one wants to go out and buy a gallon of lacquer for something so small. You don't want to use anything too hard like superglue or loctite, even though it is the same principle as loctite. The beauty of lacquer/nail polish is that if/when you want to change the saddle height, simply put an allen key in there and tweak away. The material will crack, break and flake off without any removal process necessary.

Or, if you just can never make up your mind how you like your action, that's fine too.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Aug 15th, 2017 11:03 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You can also use blue Loctite 242 (removeable) threadlocker on saddle screws. It's thinner than lacquer, so you can normally put a tiny drop on the tip of a toothpick or watch oiler and touch it to where the screw comes out of the saddle, whereupon it will wick down into the threads. Then wipe off any excess with a tissue.

Hammond101
Contributing Member
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So. Cal. USA

Aug 15th, 2017 12:54 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

A little heat will loosen Loctite for adjustment down the road. I'm a fan of it over clear nail polish. I use the blue.

vomer
Contributing Member
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Broke Down

in the Brassicas
Aug 15th, 2017 02:14 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I also recently used it on a pair of humbucker mounting screws which when adjusted for height were only just in the feet holes, and on the screws on a tuner case. Handy stuff to have in.

RKSTRAT
Contributing Member
**********
***

USA

"Clapton is Good"
Aug 18th, 2017 02:24 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks!

Got them from ALLPARTS!

They are not Fender, but thats okay.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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******

The rain sounds like

a round of applause
Aug 18th, 2017 03:10 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Ace Hardware sells individual hex wrenches too.

RKSTRAT
Contributing Member
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***

USA

"Clapton is Good"
Aug 19th, 2017 06:58 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks for all the suggestions!

I never thought about stabilizing the screws.
I guess I thought the adjustments were required
due to changes in the wood, neck changes due to climate.
I have flamed necks that are less stable.

I do have some blue loctite.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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The rain sounds like

a round of applause
Aug 19th, 2017 09:58 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Once a guitar is properly set up:

Unless you drop your guitar and the neck shifts, or you change string brand/gauge, the only occasional adjustment a typical guitar needs is a tweak of the truss rod.

Messing with the string height at the bridge can knock out your intonation settings.

uncle stack-knob
Contributing Member
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united kingdom

Sep 4th, 2017 12:29 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Note that "ball end" type hex keys are not the friendliest type to use in this application.The main reason being the very small contact area that ensues between the key and the hex nut.
Use a good "straight" type.

Stack-Knob.

FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Hex nut wrenches for Strat saddles




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