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FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / Any symetrical guitar/stringed instrument can be

hushnel
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North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
Jun 2nd, 2017 07:37 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

converted to left handed. I don't know a whole lot about guitar building, especially the acoustic variety. From what I've gathered in building and reading their is no construction process for the neck or body dependent on the arrangement of the strings, other than nut, bridge/saddle and sound post.

Is there anything I'm not considering?

(This message was last edited by hushnel at 09:38 AM, Jun 2nd, 2017)

Pinetree
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NW Pennsylvania

Jun 2nd, 2017 07:49 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I'm guessing that some high end guitars might have bracing built for the bass and treble sides in the right hand configuration, but don't see any reason why you couldn't flip it.



Hammond101
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So. Cal. USA

Jun 2nd, 2017 09:30 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Gets a bit tricky if you want to convert an acoustic and have the guitar intonate beyond open chords.

The saddle slot needs to be filled and re-routed to lefty.

Leftee
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VA

Jun 2nd, 2017 09:54 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

As mentioned. Bracing in an acoustic. And usually a new bridge as well.

Some have conversions done and don't mess with the bracing. Others do.

reformed audiophile
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long island, ny

all partscasters, all the time...
Jun 2nd, 2017 10:11 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Side dots. That's all I've got.

hushnel
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North Florida

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Jun 2nd, 2017 02:52 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I've not seen any asymmetrical bracing, that's not to say it ain't so. I would think any braceing of this type would primarily be near the bridge plate, I haven't seen it, but then I haven't torn a lot of acoustics apart, in the guitar building manuals I have nothing indicates this, same with sets of blue prints. Though called braceing the stiffening of the top and connection to the bridge plate indicated, in part, it's function is to move some of the vibration to other parts of the top. The bridge itself would probably just be replace with the angle reversed for left handed intonation.

With classical instruments the sound post is slightly offset, this could easily be changed. I'm assuming that cello or violins would have a equal dimentions in top carving, I could be wrong.

I really don't know, figure someone here will have the answer.

Concerning electrics the nut, headstock profile and bridge adjustment seem to be the only difference.

(This message was last edited by hushnel at 04:53 PM, Jun 2nd, 2017)

Peegoo
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Jun 2nd, 2017 04:06 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Asymmetrical bracing is actually pretty common.

Looky. A typical Martin D28.

hushnel
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Jun 2nd, 2017 05:59 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Humm, thanks Geno, looks like the braceing is tighter on the treble side of the bridge. Maybe to move more of the treble vibes to eq better with the bass?

I need to tear more acustics apart "o) Well maybe I could just use the Endoscope.

FunkyKikuchiyo

VT

Jun 2nd, 2017 11:02 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Flipping the bracing around won't cause structural issues. In fact, I'd be willing to bet that many "lefty" acoustics out there have righty bracing. I'm yet to really investigate this, but I just have a hunch knowing how factories often work.

The tone bars only go one way, and the X is scalloped asymetrically on many models. For some luthiers they seek a good mix of tap tones so having lopsided bracing can help a lot.

If I had to take a wild, off the cuff guess what reversing bracing would do, all other things being equal, I'd say it'll probably stiffen/tighten the sound of the low end, and the highs will have a bit less sustain/be more percussive, since the tone bars are more crowded on the treble side typically. But, total insane wild guess. Heck, you might get something cool out of it.

Pickguards are often removable if having it backwards will bug you, but that's a much smaller issue than the saddle slot. I don't know of any way around filling and recutting. I also don't know any way easier than dealing with fussy router set ups.

If we're talking a classical guitar, then the bracing is typically symmetrical, and the saddle slot is straight. Sometimes compensated saddles are used in classicals, most of the time they're straight so if there is enough height to the saddle and the nut slots have enough material for widening/narrowing as need be, you can get away with reversing it with little more effort than changing the strings.

Leftee
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VA

Jun 3rd, 2017 05:09 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

On electrics, the controls will be upside down. On the top of the front instead of the bottom. And unless you install reverse audio taper pots, the pots will be wired the same as a righty.

I suspect on less expensive acoustics the bracing is the same.

This is discussed quite a bit in the acoustic forum at leftyfrets.net. I hang out over there too.

Peegoo
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double-cross to bear
Jun 3rd, 2017 08:51 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Guitars were all ladder-braced (in the classical style) up until CF Martin came up with the X brace. Or was that Orville Gibson? I can't remember...

Leftee
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VA

Jun 3rd, 2017 09:05 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

... and don't forget the Chutes & Ladders bracing invented by Milton Bradley.

stiggowitz
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S.W.Washington

stigg "Geezer, and still lov'in it"!
Jun 3rd, 2017 10:43 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Cutaways would be a problem on an acoustic, electrics not so much:0)


Peegoo
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double-cross to bear
Jun 4th, 2017 09:18 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Brace for impact!

Pinetree
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NW Pennsylvania

Jun 4th, 2017 09:25 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You could always toss yer phone in there.

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