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FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / Songs to help learn skillfull playing of chords/rythm

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
May 27th, 2017 06:32 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Having the music room finished now I'm in a much better situation for putting some real effort into learning to play better.

I have mostly always just played what is going on in my head, not so much trying to learn songs we all know. I'm thinking its time to commit to learning more.

I'd like to hear some input from the FDP about how I ought to approach this. Things I should take note of, songs I ought to work into the mix ... whatever might be helpful.

Some songs I have taken note of as songs I want to work with are:

Sister Golden Hair (America) ... lots of fairly easy chords with fairly rapid transition. It's also a somewhat melodic chord progression.

The Weight (The Band) ... classic song that I like a lot, and it has that E chord with a G# bass that I struggle to get right. That odd fingering and the irregular timing in the chorus captivate me to get right.

Still Got the Blues (Gary Moore) ... Great song and it uses that *circle of fourths* thingy. And some specific picking on those chords.

Strutter (KISS) ... rocking song I have listened to and like for over 40 years. It's got some boogie blues pinkie stuff going on and some sections of picking notes.

Anyway that's some of what I have in mind to start with. After about five decades of *messing around* I think I'm finally ready to try and do something people might recognize ;)

I'll take advice here or you can just wish me luck ;)



Peegoo
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May 27th, 2017 08:25 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Josie, by Steely Dan. There are perhaps 15 chords in the tune--depending on the substitutions you choose (it was written on a pee-anner anyway--go figure).

At first it seems like a bridge too far, but the chords are really not that hard to get under your fingers.

And the intro lick is a *killer* that not a whole lot of players have in their bag.

While you're at it, get Rikki Don't Lose That Number (easier than Josie) into your bag o' tricks.

These tunes are a college course in harmony, rhythm, and timing.

Bottom line: if you're working on your rhythm chops, the absolute best thing you can do is use a metronome. How complicated the tune is does not matter. Even if you're playing Row Row Row Your Boat, a metronome *will* make you a better player, guaranteed.

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
May 28th, 2017 08:41 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Thanks for the response Geno, I'll work those into the rotation.

I'll go back through some of the threads on metronome. I know Robert has one he has recommended many times and it isn't very expensive.



Peegoo
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double-cross to bear
May 29th, 2017 09:40 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Cheers, Larry.

Send me an email at s9ix0-t9en9@com9ca9st.ne9t (remove the 9s) and I'll send you charts for these with some helpful notes.

Metronomes by Wittner and Matrix are really good. I have both brands here and they work great. Ruggedly built and long 9v battery life too. Go to Amazon and check 'em out. Shop around for best price.

The Matrix MR800 is a pretty good one.

So is the Wittner MT-50.

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
May 29th, 2017 03:55 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Email sent.

Thanks Geno ;)

Dolemite

What It Was!

Fairly Unbalanced
May 30th, 2017 07:37 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Drum loops on YT are free, all tempos & feels, and a lot more fun and funky. Just an option.

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
May 30th, 2017 09:24 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I have thought about that as well Rick.

I have (and have had for years) this little tool, Kawai GB-2 Session Trainer .

My Son used it a lot for drums. It has about 50 pre-set loops then it used ROM cards, which I have several of ... Blues, 50s Rock, Santana, Gary Moore are what I currently have. I keep watching eBay for more. then it can be programmed to custom loops a swell. It's pretty versatile.

The link below is a very long drawn out factory demo instruction manual in video form.

Kawai GB-2 Session Trainer

Peegoo
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I've got my own

double-cross to bear
May 30th, 2017 05:52 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Hey brother, did you get an 'undeliverable' return on your email to me? I ask because no joy here.

Achase4u

U.S. - Virginia

May 30th, 2017 06:29 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Josie is a fun tune for chording.

If you are feeling particularly ambitious, there is a great book in a series by Barry Galbraith(wicked, wicked guitar player from long ago) published by Jamey Abersold Jazz. Now, if you don't like jazz, then ignore the rest of this message.

The book is "Guitar Comping" with bass lines in treble clef.

Not too many people outside of the classical realm can sight read busy chord clusters so don't worry about that - just take a tune each month and do several bars a day deciphering and learning the grips, thinking about the chord tones etc. This certainly builds skillful playing of chords and rhythm. The fun thing is that it will carry over into any genre you wish to play. My rock playing has improved because of this book.

Guitar Comping

BlondeStrat
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Las Vegas NV

Can't complain but sometimes I still do
May 30th, 2017 07:07 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I tried it again Geno.

As I looked at the first one there was a comma at the end of the address ... maybe that slipped it up.

Oddly, I got no rejection notice and your email address was not loaded into my file roster. Other than the email in my *sent* folder, it was like it never happened. :(

Peegoo
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double-cross to bear
May 30th, 2017 08:39 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Roger!

Dolemite

What It Was!

Fairly Unbalanced
May 31st, 2017 05:45 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Another (unsolicited) 2 cents - I'd dive into the curriculum of KRU* before wading into the deep end of the Steely Dan pool.



*Keith Richards University.

The greatest rhythm guitarist ever, for my (again unsolicited) 2 cents ; )

(This message was last edited by Dolemite at 07:45 AM, May 31st, 2017)

Leftee
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VA

May 31st, 2017 08:36 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My take has been to choose songs that really move me and learn those. Whatever those might be.

gdw3

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
May 31st, 2017 02:22 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Some of my all-time favorite rhythms to play are old ZZ Top songs. Such a tasty rhythm player! Heard It On The X is my favorite, but it's actually pretty hard cuz it's so fast. Just Got Paid is a great one. Beer Drinkers and Hell Raisers is fun and easier. I Thank You & La Grange are good ones, too.

Hey, and I have no issues with you learning some old KISS. I learned that whole first album when I was getting into playing. Because of their cartoony image, those first 3 albums were actually over-looked for being solid blues-based rock.



FDP Forum / The Chop Shop / Songs to help learn skillfull playing of chords/rythm




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