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FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / It was probably not a good idea...

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drksd4848

USA

May 18th, 2017 03:47 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

...to press tuner bushings into a hole that wasn't quite big enough for them....

I was trying to ream the holes out with a drill bit wrapped with sand paper. That did the trick and the bushings fit now, but as I was reaming, I would press the bushings into the tuner hole to check the progress.

I didn't realize what that was doing to the back of the headstock. Take a look at the pic:

It's hard to see, but if you look closely you'll see these light streaks in the front, and one at the bottom. If you run your finger across the streaks you'll feel a crease.

I assume these are stress marks. Would this be in the finish, or is it in the wood? Is this something that is fixable by sanding a refinishing, or is it permanently damaged? The good news is it's only on the back. I'm just worried that when I drill the mounting holes it will put more stress on the headstock if the stress marks are the wood, causing it to crack.

Headstock damage?

(This message was last edited by drksd4848 at 05:49 PM, May 18th, 2017)

hushnel
Contributing Member
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North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
May 18th, 2017 03:53 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I can't really see it, the edge of the headstock looks like it's a flat sawn piece, with the grain running parallel to the face, perpendicular grain can cause sever headstock breaks but are fairly east to repair.

drksd4848

USA

May 18th, 2017 04:01 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I'll see if I can get a picture of it at a better angle. I know when I run my fingers across it, I feel a definite crease.

Pinetree
Moderator Emeritus
(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

May 18th, 2017 09:04 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Just play the dang thing.




twangdoodles

michigan usa

May 19th, 2017 04:32 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I can't see anything wrong in that picture (other than what looks like a finish scratch near the low E hole). Maple is a very hard wood. Causing a crack in the manner you describe would be very rare.

drksd4848

USA

May 19th, 2017 09:11 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

twangdoodles:

Yeah, It's hard to get a good pic of the actual "damage", which may mean it's much adieu about nothing.

I were to describe it properly, it seems like it is warpage around the tuner holes from me - I believe - constantly pressing in the bushing to see if it fits as, I reamed out the hole. That may have potentially stretched the tuner hole, forcing the wood around it to buckle. This would be my theory.

And anytime you talk about warpage in a guitar neck, you worry about playability - which is really the important thing.

With my other work-horse Amst strats and Teles, that's pretty much the only thing I care about. I throw them around like rag dolls. I just make sure they are well maintained. But when I assemble a partscaster, things like the above go directly up my tailpipe! I screw something up and it's all I can see/think about! @#$#&*!!!


Pinetree:

Um... yup. That seems to be the universal fix for all guitar issues.

(This message was last edited by drksd4848 at 11:20 AM, May 19th, 2017)

BobbyMac
Contributing Member
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California Escapee

Don't look at me with that tone of voice
May 19th, 2017 09:33 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Your linked photo shows absolutely nothing that you are talking about.

drksd4848

USA

May 19th, 2017 09:40 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Yes, its a bad photo. I'll get a better one up there. Disregard for now.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
***

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
May 19th, 2017 07:31 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"Yes, its a bad photo."

IMO the photo is not so bad in its resolution, but probably the angle & lighting.
That said, and generally speaking IMO, if it's difficult to show in a photograph it's less severe than we "think" it is.

"Is this something that is fixable by sanding and refinishing..."

I would say yes, with the exclusion of the refinishing bit.
I'd suggest *very* light wet-sanding with 1200 grit and a good flat sanding block.
I am certain the amount of sanding required to remove the "imperfections" would not be enough that you would sand through to bare wood.

Follow this up with Micro-Gloss liquid abrasive #1 (or similar) and you can restore the shine to the original finish.

The other alternative, as others have suggested, is just live with it. It's not a "stands out like a pimple on a pumpkin" sort of thing.
I could pick out imperfections on every guitar I've built, modded or otherwise and it doesn't worry me. And TBH, 99% of people wouldn't notice.


FunkyKikuchiyo

VT

May 19th, 2017 07:57 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My guess is that you saw something in the wood grain you didn't see before and freaked yourself out.

If you cracked maple, you'd know it. If you really want to verify, grab the neck and try to split it with your hands where you think the damage is. If it opens, you broke it. If it doesn't, you're just fine.

Usually when breaks happen on pegheads from tuner installation, a break will happen along a seam (there are none here), or you'll get chip out. If you were to have an overly big drill bit on a drill press, you're more likely to spin the neck around and hit yourself in the head than break the neck.

twangdoodles

michigan usa

May 19th, 2017 07:57 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

(Ahem) it's ado.

Adieu.

drksd4848

USA

May 19th, 2017 08:17 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

OK, I think these pics should clarify everything:

This is the front. You can see the tearing around the tuner holes. That, I'm pretty sure I can fix with some light sanding and finish - I was going to refinish the headstock anyway...

FRONT

drksd4848

USA

May 19th, 2017 08:25 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Here is the back, and this is what I'm really worried about.

Notice the ridges by the tuner holes. It looks like the wood sort of buckled. It's worse than it looks; it's basically around all of the tuner holes.

Could sanding fix that?

BTW: Twangdoodles, Ado + Adieu = A DOH!

BACK - me think-ie this don't look so good

Pinetree
Moderator Emeritus
(with many stars)

NW Pennsylvania

May 19th, 2017 08:30 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You shoulda had them tuners on by now.


Try not to overthink t.



drksd4848

USA

May 19th, 2017 08:38 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

And... One more for good measure. This is toward the fretboard side of the headstock.

Notice that hard ridge at the top. Again, I think it looks better than it is. I can say that was definitely not there before I started screwing with it.

The real question I guess is, is it in the finish, or is it in the wood?

BACK 2

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
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Australia

American-made in Oz!!
May 20th, 2017 12:28 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

OK, I do see *something* there, but it still has me stumped. I don't (or can't) see any evidence that the timber at the edge of the hole has been "lifted".

I presume that if you're using press-in bushes, they for Kluson-style tuners.
If that's the case, the tuner bodies are going to cover 90%+ of that area.

I'm leaning toward over-thinking it now too.

Sorry :^)

twangdoodles

michigan usa

May 20th, 2017 05:56 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Looks like you just made some minor indentations, probably just in the finish. You could fix it if it really bothers you but it's likely not worth the effort. I wouldn't bother.

Let it be a learning experience and a reminder, like those file marks in the finish on the headstock of the guitar that received my first-ever nut replacement (ouch!).

hushnel
Contributing Member
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North Florida

A Friend of Bill W.
May 20th, 2017 07:28 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

If the neck/headstock is flat sawn, which it looks like to me in the first picture, it looks like you've lifted the grain at the surface of the wood, similar to how a plywood would de-laminate.

If this is the case I would use a low viscosity creeping glue, wax paper and clamp it. If it is just mm of surface coming up I wouldn't even worry about it.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
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******

I've got my own

double-cross to bear
May 20th, 2017 10:18 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

If the finish is not cracked, then that un-smooth surface was probably already like that before you started reefin' on it with hammers and crowbars :o)

catnineblue

LA , Calif

I try my best
May 20th, 2017 02:47 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

" ...to press tuner bushings into a hole that wasn't quite big enough for them....

"I was trying to ream the holes out with a drill bit wrapped with sand paper. That did the trick and the bushings fit now, but as I was reaming, I would press the bushings into the tuner hole to check the progress."

If you used sandpaper on a drill bit , I assume you wrapped the paper on the shank of the bit. When you say you checked the fit of the bushing , if this means you by hand tried to see if they would go in and didn't force them in all the way. If you forced them and pulled them out or even fit them by hand to see and pulled them out that might lift finish. I am lost on the back of the head stock . did you enlarge the hole all the way through?

When I built my 4 strats I just drilled the standard size holes for Gotoh Vintage and then measured the bushing at the spline then used a 1/4" socket that had the OD at the bolt end that was just a bit under the spline OD and used bee's wax and just lined then square and tapped them in.

Stew mac has some EXPENSIVE special drill bit does it in one shot. The Bushing only needs to fit snug enough to stay in place and the splines are not that deep.

I just see finish scratches not cracks in the maple. How about a photo of the bit and sandpaper you used.

"I didn't realize what that was doing to the back of the headstock. Take a look at the pic:" All I see there is a small chamfer around the hole.

(This message was last edited by catnineblue at 04:58 PM, May 20th, 2017)

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FDP Forum / Guitar Mods, Repairs, and Projects / It was probably not a good idea...




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