FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Sweetwater

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

Jensen Loudspeakers

Apex Tube Matching

Antique Electronics Supply

WD Music

Guitar Center

MOD KITS DIY

Musician's Friend

Amazon

Amplified Parts


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Fender Guitars: Stratocasters / Need Strat Pickup Advice...

theaerovons

USA

Jan 27th, 2017 07:15 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

A few years ago I picked up a Mex Strat, had locking tuners put on, and had them change out the pickups to Fat 50s.

The problem I'm having now that I use it for lots of recording is that compared to the Strats I hear on the records I get hired to cover (mostly country) this thing sounds really thin. It's ok if I'm doing a jangly rhythm part, but any leads, or lead fills just sound super thin.
The bridge pup is especially thin.

I'm not trying turn this into a Les Paul but need pickups to give this thing some more "oomph."

Thanks for any input!

drksd4848

USA

Jan 27th, 2017 07:55 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Fat 50s are already a fairly hot pickup, so the only thing I could offer for you to try - and you may or may not have already tried this - is to raise the pickup height slightly, especially closer to the high end strings. Sometimes that will give it a little more beef.



Doc Sarvis
Contributing Member
**********
*******

USA/Salt Lake City

Tuned Strings and Tight Lines
Jan 27th, 2017 08:33 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Ditto. There's something amiss and it's probably not the pickups themselves.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
***

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Jan 27th, 2017 09:05 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Have you tried using compressor or clean boost pedal?
I had a set fat 50's and never found them lacking in any way.

If you're not a pedal guy, try setting your amp volume with your guitar volume set at 7. Then you can just boost your guitar for solos with the guitar's volume knob.

Te 52

Laws of Physics

strictly enforced
Jan 27th, 2017 10:08 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Fat '50s definitely have more meat. They're currently my personal favorite Strat pickups.

I've also been impressed with the Tonerider Classic Blues pickups that are used in the Squier Classic Vibe '60s Strat. Pretty reasonably priced, too, at $100 a set.

Mick Reid
Contributing Member
***

Australia

American-made in Oz!!
Jan 28th, 2017 03:07 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"I've also been impressed with the Tonerider Classic Blues pickups that are used in the Squier Classic Vibe '60s Strat."

+1

They are great value and highly under-rated (except by those "in the know")

;^)



Purple Valley
Contributing Member
**********

USA

Jan 28th, 2017 03:09 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I agree that Fat 50's pups should be plenty fat enough. But if you still have the original MIM pups, by any chance, I'd try putting the bridge pup back in and see how that works. Those ceramic pups are definitely fatter, darker and hotter than Fat 50's, and might work well as a fat bridge pup. Worth a try, anyway.

littleuch
Contributing Member
**********
*****

Florida

Jan 28th, 2017 07:07 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You could try adding a baseplate to the bridge pickup, or try a Fralin overwound that has it already installed. Personally I'd look for a solution post guitar cord.

DrKev
Contributing Member
*****

Irishman in Paris

It's just a guitar, not rocket science.
Jan 28th, 2017 07:11 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Some thoughts...

Is the bridge pickuo wired to one of the tone controls? It'll be brighter if not.

Assuming the Fat 50s are indeed how everyone else here suggests, meaty or fatter, then your recording tone and setup could be looked at too.

When recording, don't be afraid to use a *slightly* overdriven sound for clean tones. In the mix of a recording, it's often not really heard as overdriven but just more full and thicker.

Also when recording, remember that the sound we like to hear in front of the amp, or when soloing the channel on the desk, is often not a sound that works well in the mix.

Microphone choice and position is all important. Dead center on the speaker cone can be aggressively bright. Right against the grille cloth at the edge of the speaker can be dull and boomy. Find out what works in a mix of the song you're recording for.

celius

USA

Ace
Jan 28th, 2017 08:28 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

All of the comments with regard to the quality of the Fat 50's, height adjustments, and the possibility of a hotter bridge pup are spot on (and tone or amp adjustments) but the main issue for you seems to be the recording part. The advice as to microphone placement might be the best in term of placement in the middle of the cone or the time honored side of the cone with an SM57.

I might suggest (if possible) to consider two things. First, many studios/engineers like to place a board on the floor in front of the amp to brighten out sound near the mike placement. This is great to help cut through the recording mix but can result in some shrillness for the lead parts. Two suggestions; try laying carpet out in from of the amp for the lead recording process to darken the ambient sound a little bit and try using two mikes (one near the grill and another one a little further out on the carpet) to see if that helps to fatten out the recorded lead result.

It is often hard to replicate the room sound of the rig to tape/digital but you can get close if the engineer knows a little bit about what is needed/wanted for clean sounds versus a more meaty part/lead for the guitar.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********
******

The spotlight

looks like a prison break
Jan 28th, 2017 11:13 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"The advice as to microphone placement might be the best in term of placement in the middle of the cone or the time honored side of the cone with an SM57."

^^^^THIS

I'll bet you're going direct to the board. Thin sound is often due to the lack of air space between the guitar and the tape :o)

Some of the most famous guitar tones in history were recorded with a dinky little amp and the mic right in the speaker cone. Makes for huge tone.

celius

USA

Ace
Jan 28th, 2017 01:04 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Peegoo is correct. I managed a recording studio for a few years in the late 80's and our three engineers were Criteria Studios alum who did side-work at this place. They were at Criteria in the 70's/80's (heyday of thick guitar tones from Layla through the heavy metal days) and I learned that trick from watching them mike up the amps. Running straight into the board is a big no no for thick leads. However, sometimes it works very well for clean work (think of Billy Gibbons and Blue Jean Blues); he went straight into the board for that one (but playing his Pearly Gates Paul)

FDP Forum / Fender Guitars: Stratocasters / Need Strat Pickup Advice...




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2017 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved