FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / FAQ's

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Musician's Friend

Amazon

Jensen Loudspeakers

Antique Electronics Supply

MOD KITS DIY

Yellowjackets Tube Converters

WD Music

Amplified Parts

Sweetwater

Guitar Center

Apex Tube Matching


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

   
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

FDP Forum / Home Recording Forum / Making vocals sound backed off

gdw3

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Mar 28th, 2015 01:53 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I wonder if there is a trick, like probably with a combo of EQ and room verb, to make a vocal track sound like the person is farther away from the mic. I have a song where the singer sings the bridge more softly, but to compensate, she got closer to the mic. I didn't hear it so much until I started mixing the whole thing. Now it sounds really obvious to me. Any tips?

themaestro
Contributing Member
**********
***

Wichita, Kansas

Drums = pulse, Bass = heartbeat
Mar 28th, 2015 02:05 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You need less "presence" in the vocal. Close micing brings this out. You need to process the vocal channel to mimic far micing.

A few tricks. Of course you will need to experiment:

1) Back off the voice in the mix a little bit.

2) Cut EQ highs and lows. This removes sibilance and proximity effect.

3) A little more vocal reverb than in other places in the song. Note, I said more reverb, not longer reverb. Keep the same reverb settings except for how much you add into the track.

Good luck.



Roly
Contributing Member
**********
*******

Whitehorse Canada

I don't get out much
Mar 28th, 2015 02:07 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

If the mic has a cardioid capsule, proximity effect will be an issue.
Have a look ay both parts on some kind of spectrum analyser tool.
Could be as simple as roiling some bottom off the parts where she's closer to the mic.

Achase4u

U.S. - Virginia

Mar 28th, 2015 03:13 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

All good advice - I would add - pull down your pre delay on the vocal verb. Without any pre delay or distance between the source and early reflections, it makes it sound more "in" the reverb, and thus futher away.

Getting up on the mic is good to maintain a level - but at the same time, that really gives you the "in your face" kind of sound. The highs are the first frequencies to go when backing off a mic, so getting up closer will make them seem more present. I would high shelf and subtract starting around upper mids 3kish maybe. A gradual Q so that by 5k you are pulling back the max value of the shelf.

Also pull back that proximity effect, as others have stated.

You can also curb some "in your faceness" with a compressor. Look for something with a fast attack. Background vocals are treated this way sometimes to keep them in the back. The faster attack will take some edge off the notes. Do this subtly, though.

Good luck - hopefully we can hear it sometime!

gdw3

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Mar 30th, 2015 04:22 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Great advice. Thanks! Yes, the track is going to mastering soon, so will let you all know when it's ready!

guitarmoog
Contributing Member
**********
*

Belgium

I wouldn't say that's excessive
Apr 1st, 2015 04:22 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Excellent advice all round IMHO. A couple of other ideas:

One of the ways we perceive closeness is the high end content in a sound. The further something is away from us, the less top-end we perceive, so gently shelving off a bit of the high end (say from 6 or 8 K up) can push a track back in a mix. I also find with backing vocals that panning them away from the main central vocal helps to make them sound like there are around and behind it, rather than just trying to push it back. Finally, more reverb, and even a tiny bit of delay pushes things back, particularly if it is a wide stereo delay as it helps to smear the exact perceived point of the sound in the stereo field. When thing are close to us, we can point very accurately at where the sound is coming from, but the further away they get, the less precise we can be, so the smearing effect makes us think they are further away.

gdw3

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Apr 7th, 2015 04:03 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Cool. I'll try all those!

Roly
Contributing Member
**********
*******

Whitehorse Canada

I don't get out much
Apr 11th, 2015 03:19 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Did you have any luck?

gdw3

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Apr 12th, 2015 02:31 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Not bad. Actually going to be talking to the mastering engineer about a re-mix before final master....

FDP Forum / Home Recording Forum / Making vocals sound backed off




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Chris Greene  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2017 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved