FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / Classifieds / FAQ's / Links / Cookbook

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

Antique Electronics Supply

Sweetwater

Jensen Loudspeakers

Amazon

Guitar Center

Amplified Parts

WD Music

Bill Lawrence Pickups

The Music Zoo

Musician's Friend

MOD KITS DIY

www.thetubestore.com


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

Registered Members: 64,000+

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

  For Sale/Wanted Classifieds

 
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

ALL FDP MEMBERS CAN NOW POST IN MOE'S

FDP Forum / Home Recording Forum / Phasing between direct and mic signals

gdw3
Contributing Member
**

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Feb 28th, 2012 12:44 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Came upon an interesting discovery the other day. I was using the Line Out from my amp as well as a mic on the speaker to record 2 simultaneous guitar tracks. They sounded o.k., but kinda weak. I went in closer to the waveforms, and noticed that the mic track was slightly delayed compared to the direct track, tho both were going thru the same audio interface. Getting in super close, I nudged the direct track slightly later, until the wave peaks matched up better. Big difference! Even a tiny nudge in either direction, and the tone changed considerably.

I'm guessing that Digital Performer has a way to automatically delay a signal on the input. I just don't how to do it yet, so I'll have to delve in deeper to find it, or go to a DP forum. Unless somebody here knows?

Also, I wonder about the effect of mixing the direct signal in with the speaker in a live situation. Should I be concerned about phasing?

(This message was last edited by gdw3 at 12:45 PM, Feb 28th, 2012)

gdw3
Contributing Member
**

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Feb 28th, 2012 10:51 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Well, I found a way (in DP6) to delay the audio input a certain number of samples, but it's all or nothing. Can't do it input by input.

(This message was last edited by gdw3 at 11:22 PM, Feb 28th, 2012)

stevesmith
Contributing Member
**********
**********
**********

Australia

Lucky bastard
Feb 29th, 2012 12:42 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Latency and buffer/sample size.

nicnite

usa

Telebastard
Feb 29th, 2012 03:48 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Easy enough to correct just by slipping the track a a bit like you did.

Generally isn't a problem unless you are using two identical mics, close mic+DI, or are recording something with a lot of low end. The reason is that if the tracks are significantly different there won't be much cancellation at the shorter wavelengths because the waveforms are different enough. Keep in mind though that if the tracks ARE fairly different (two mics on a kick, one close one further away, aligning one frequency band will usually mean there will be some cancellation at other frequencies. Usually alignment is most helpful for kick and bass.

Then there are cases where it's easiest to just flip phase 180 degrees: mic in front and behind cab, or top and bottom of snare. That's to compensate for the fact the ACOUSTIC source (speaker/drum heads) are moving 180 degrees out of phase.

n



gdw3
Contributing Member
**

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Mar 3rd, 2012 09:47 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"Latency and buffer/sample size."

Not for just one of the 2 tracks. I can record many more at once with no problems.

"close mic+DI"

That's exactly what it is, the DI being the Line Out from the amp.

What I may end up doing is saving a delay setting of just a few samples long, so I can recall it quickly, without having to go in and do the shift manually every time.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********

That chicken

is WRONG, baby.
Mar 3rd, 2012 10:46 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Mic distance from the speaker is another way to mitigate the issue. A direct signal, coupled with a mic a distance away to get the room sound, is a great way to capture a "live" amp sound, without the phase issue.

gdw3
Contributing Member
**

LA-la-land, CA

Insert clever comment here
Mar 3rd, 2012 11:14 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I'll try it.

FDP Forum / Home Recording Forum / Phasing between direct and mic signals




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Black Hole Gang  Chris Greene  EA6B  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2014 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved