FDP Home Page / FDP Forum / Classifieds / FAQ's / Links / Cookbook

The FDP is made possible by the following companies and individual members like you.
Please use the links below to show them we value their sponsorship.

The Music Zoo

Amplified Parts

Amazon

Antique Electronics Supply

WD Music

Bill Lawrence Pickups

Musician's Friend

www.thetubestore.com

Sweetwater

Guitar Center

Jensen Loudspeakers

MOD KITS DIY


* God bless America and our men and women in uniform *

* Illegitimi non carborundum! *

If you benefit and learn from the FDP and enjoy our site, please help support us and become a Contributing Member or make a Donation today! The FDP counts on YOU to help keep the site going with an annual contribution. It's quick and easy with PayPal. Please do it TODAY!

Chris Greene, Host & Founder

Registered Members: 64,000+

LOST YOUR PASSWORD?

......................................................................

  For Sale/Wanted Classifieds

 
FDP Jam
Calendar
Find musicians
in your area!
  Search the Forums  

ALL FDP MEMBERS CAN NOW POST IN MOE'S

FDP Forum / Miscellaneous and Non-Fender Topics / how do you intonate those old Les Paul Jr.'s?????

otisian

vancouver

One guitar Otis (but it has 10 settings)
Feb 18th, 2012 02:48 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

From looking at Johnny Thunder's T.V. Yellow Les Paul Jr. with the one black bridge P-90 (sounds awesome btw)....there is no proper bridge...just astop tail piece with holes in it to string the strings in a wrap around fashion...obviously you can raise and lower the "bridge" but it has no moving parts...so i guess intonation was kinda out of the question...what about the newer models or reissues?...seems to me they could keep the org. look by having curved movable saddles (shaped like the stop bar bridge) on top...it would still be a 1 piece but you'd be able to intonate it to some extent.

Did folks back in the day that played them (and they WERE very popular in the late 60's) just except the fact that they'd never be perfect tuning wise? Or is there some kind of trick?

Also what about Pete Townsend's late 60's/early 70's SG specials with P-90's those look like they have had something removed and just have the one wrap around bridge...was it a trapeze tail piece? a reg stop bar tune-o-matic...or what..i'm confused....they sure sound great though!

twangdoodles
Contributing Member
**

michigan usa

Feb 18th, 2012 03:29 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

The wrap-arounds have two set-screws on the back. Turning them in moves the bridge back from the posts. It ain't no tunamatic, but it gets the job done passably well. PRS, I believe (perhaps among others) makes a wrap-around that has adjustable saddles.

here's a gibby-style one

CVH
Contributing Member
*********

The Resurrector

"No thread is dead"
Feb 18th, 2012 04:13 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

If you only have two set-screws to intonate with, do you just intonate the E strings and trust everything in between to fall into place, or what?

BrentD
Contributing Member
***

Lansing, MI

Feb 18th, 2012 05:14 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

CVH, pretty much. If things were bad in the middle I'd find the offenders and try to get things balanced for the worst two of them.

Uncle Pat

Central KY

Seasonal musician
Feb 18th, 2012 05:26 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I like the old Leo Quan Badass bridge for this. Non-invasive installation and great intonation.

Vic Vega
Contributing Member
*******

Massachusetts

Happy to be at the top of the food chain
Feb 18th, 2012 05:37 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

They intonate just fine. Will it be perfect? No, but good enough, IMO.

The PRS stop tail bridge is my all time favorite.

scott-s
Contributing Member
*

juneau ak.

scott-s
Feb 18th, 2012 07:54 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

A few things come to mind, 1st, when you say old- I gotta ask how old? If it doesn't have set screws at the posts its older than the ones I've seen. But regardless, one can sometimes get these non-adjustables really close just by changing your string gauges around a bit- try going bigger { remember if it's an old one, it was built back when men were men and they didn't use no dinky wires when they played their geetars. Next,dig out your Stew Mac catalog and order some TonePros Locking Studs, regardless of whether or not you change out your bridge, these things keep the inherent forward lean out of the mix and will get you closer still to your end goal, If trying these things haven't helped enough its time for the adjustable saddle wraparound bridge. There are lots to chose from- Ive had good luck with the aluminum Pigtail also sold by Stew Mac. They're not cheap, but you get your set-up dead on with any type string of your choosing. I'm no guru, but this is what Ive tried on a few of these type of stoptail bridge guitars to get them playing & sounding better. P.S. the viewing audience request pics. of your old Jr.!


SoK66
Contributing Member
****

USA

We had the hit but Van got the money
Feb 18th, 2012 08:05 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Back in the day Gibson started fitting them with a stop tail/bridge with ridges that approximated bridge saddles. Unfortunately the ridges matched up with wound third strings and made the problem even worse with an unwound G. A guy named Leo Kwan started selling something called the BadAss bridge that replaced the original included adjustable saddles. Numerous copies came along later.

Peegoo
Contributing Member
**********
**********

That chicken

is WRONG, baby.
Feb 19th, 2012 10:00 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"Back in the day Gibson started fitting them with a stop tail/bridge with ridges that approximated bridge saddles."

They called this a "lightning bridge" at the time because the raised, jagged boss cast into the top of the bar resembled a lightning bolt.

The plain-top bar bridge is virtually self intonating (as long as it's placed in the right spot), because of the curved top surface of the bar. The intonation is progressive as you move up the neck; as you depress a string farther up the neck, the take-off point of the string moves toward the nut due to the curved top surface of the bridge. It was a totally unintended feature that actually works pretty well. I like 'em. I also like the newer-style lightning bridge that has the extended shape for the plain G string.

Just Play

Northwest USA

Feb 23rd, 2012 06:08 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Mine is a '56. No set screws. She plays just fine up and down the neck. No issues.


JohnS

USA

Feb 23rd, 2012 06:14 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Epiphone makes one now that is correct for a plain G.

Gaukdawg

Ohio

I'm with you fellers!
Feb 24th, 2012 08:47 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

These are kind of pricey to me but there is this you can get if you need to adjust individual strings. I have a PRS SE with the wraparound bridge and it is dead on for intonation. I think they spent a little time figuring out nut height and everything and it seems that they did a prety good job

wraparound PRS bridge w/ adjustable saddles

Pinetree
Contributing Member
**********
***

Lemmy For President

Feb 24th, 2012 08:56 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

How do you intonate those old Les Paul Jr.'s?


You don't.

Love, Leslie West.



Steve Dallman
Contributing Member
*****

Merrill, Wisconsin

Dangit! Hot weather.
Feb 24th, 2012 01:51 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

There are all sorts of adjustable wrap around bridges out there. Here's a Gotoh.

Gotoh/Wilkinson

Steve Dallman
Contributing Member
*****

Merrill, Wisconsin

Dangit! Hot weather.
Feb 24th, 2012 01:52 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

One need not spend a lot.

Adjustable bridge

Dadical
Contributing Member
**********
**

I am not a complete

idiot - I have several pieces missing!
Feb 24th, 2012 02:06 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Intonation is in the fingers.

Shinnbone

ATL-GA-USA

Okinawa, Japan>Santa Cruz, Bolivia>ATL
Feb 24th, 2012 02:06 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

My main guitar is a Les Paul Special. It intonates OK with a regular set of strings, but here is what I do to make it sound a little more in tune.

When you look at a typically set-up guitar bridge, you'd notice that the saddles form (roughly) 2 straight lines. Strings 1,2 and 3 are almost straight, then 4 ,5 and 6 are almost straight. That's where the saddles need to be for a regular (or your run-of-the-mill) set of strings to be properly intonated.

Now then, if you restring with lighter 1st, 2nd, and 3rd strings, their saddles would have to move forward, making the 2 lines (roughly) 1 straight line. (Edited for string numbering confusion)

I've been buying my strings from juststring.com for years, and when I got the Special, I simply tinkered with different mixes.

(This message was last edited by Shinnbone at 08:21 AM, Feb 25th, 2012)

steze
Contributing Member
*******

Chicago IL.

Feb 26th, 2012 09:51 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I've been playing a guitar with a wraptail bridge for years (Historic 54 LP). At the time I bought it I was a bit concerned that I would not be able to intonate it, so I was considering getting the 56 instead. Glad I got the 54. Guitars with wraptail bridges have a different (better) feel and sound in my opinion. It intonates well and stays in tune. Just remember, you can't adjust intonation on acoustic guitars, yet no one ever worries about that. At least with the wraptail you have the two adjustment screws.

scott-s
Contributing Member
*

juneau ak.

scott-s
Feb 26th, 2012 02:14 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

You make a very good point when you compare the intonation of acoustic guitars and the wraptail.But for some people, even being a little bit out just drives 'em crazy, and in some guitars it just doesn't stand out a bad as others. The other day I played a '55 Jr. at a store with the smooth top bridge and it had the adjustment screws that push against the post, and then looked at some pictures of the bridge of a '58 double cut and couldn't see any, but the posts were angled or I should say offset. My friend who has a Collings said that that company is making the smoothtop style out bell metal ( some sort of Bronze alloy) and was thinking about trying one out.

jay1vinton

Hawaii, USA

Perfect is the enemy of good enough
Mar 5th, 2012 01:47 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

ON my PRS Mccarty with PRS wraparound, I intonate the treble E and I intonate the bass E, damn if all the others don't fall into approximately accurate intonation.

FDP Forum / Miscellaneous and Non-Fender Topics / how do you intonate those old Les Paul Jr.'s?????




Reply to this Topic
Display my email address             Lost your password?
Your Message:
Link Address (URL):
Link Title:




Moderators: Black Hole Gang  Chris Greene  EA6B  Iron Man  reverendrob  

FDP, LLC Privacy Policy: Your real name, username, and email
are held in confidence and not disclosed to any third parties, sold, or
used for anything other than FDP Forum registration unless you specifically authorize disclosure.

Furtkamp.com 
Internet Application Development

Copyright © 1999-2014 Fender Discussion Page, LLC   All Rights Reserved