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FDP Forum / Fender Amps: Vintage (before 1985) / How to properly turn on/off my amp

Previous 20 Messages  
barry.b
Contributing Member
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australia

Jan 29th, 2012 01:41 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

from the article...

"I use the standby switch when cycling power on other people's amps; otherwise they get a bit pissy..."

Haw Haw!

L.H.B.
Contributing Member
***

the joisey flats

welcome to the zoo...
Jan 29th, 2012 09:46 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

if your sr has a gz34 rectifier, just leave the standby on and use the on/off switch.

blues74

EU

"...gonna be a magic boy..."
Jan 29th, 2012 03:04 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"I have read that a tube amp does not sound its best until at least 30 min after being turned on, which I suppose is AFTER the standby is flipped on."

I'm glad somebody has read that ;) It's something I've always experienced in real life. Nowadays, I always take amps out of standby half an hour before a gig.
And if it's in a book, it's not my imagination;)


BBQ Gord

CANADA

Didn't chew kill my bruvah?
Jan 30th, 2012 07:52 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I put a standby sw into a Princeton Rev but I guess they're largely unnecessary. Maybe the only reason there's one in a Deluxe Rev is cos they're like a large amp with small tubes and trannys. I can't think of another small old amp that includes a stby sw.

mxlplzx
Contributing Member
***

Joysey

Jan 31st, 2012 07:44 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I was rereading Dave Funks amp workbook, and he mentions the stripping...I am pretty sure Weber does too.

So by reading different books and articles I change my habits. Now, again it seems I need to, doh! at least for standby switches.

So ignore the standby, at least on power up.

What about constant voltage/heat on the power tubes?
Not trying to push the use of standby's, but that is the only thing I see it useful for, at least for the Fenders I own. Playing ends, take a break, amp in standby. Is it even a matter of power tube life at this point?

KD2
Contributing Member
*****

USA / TX

KDakaWalt
Jan 31st, 2012 08:21 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

The only good way is to use the main circuit breaker outside.

AzteC

CA

SDSU Aztec for LIFE
Feb 4th, 2012 05:29 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

mxlplzx, don't you flip the standby switch on first, wait ~30 seconds, then turn on the power switch

Deacon Blues
Contributing Member

Guitars tuned good

and firm feelin' wimmerns.
Feb 6th, 2012 08:24 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Yes, Aztec, that is the correct usage for the standby switch.
As for their usefulness, I'll continue to use mine in that manner. I'll also continue to believe that giving the tubes full juice on start up can't be good for them. YMMV

Hammond101
Contributing Member
*

So. Cal. USA

Feb 6th, 2012 04:05 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

IMO with tube rectification the standby switch is not really neccessary. However with solid state rectification it can be of value and extend power tube life. (Twin Reverb, Showman, Bandmaster, Concert etc.)

Plus, I love that big "KerChunk" sound of a Fender amp when you have her all warmed up and take her off standby! Sounds like "Victory".

jhawkr
Contributing Member
**********
*********

USA

Someday, I'll get serious about playing!
Feb 6th, 2012 04:34 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I use the standby when turning on but just turn it off for off.

Modal Magic
Contributing Member
****

MBJ, Highway Hound.

You Can't Bend It Aussie!
Feb 6th, 2012 11:51 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I do the same thing jhawkr. It also saves the occasional pop through the speaker when the switch mechanism doesn’t move fast enough and arcs out. Seems to happen on my Fender standby equipped amps (but doesn't seem to happen on the Marshall).

6L6
Contributing Member
**********
***

Lago, CA

Kick the tires, Light the fires!
Feb 11th, 2012 08:36 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Power switch... "First ON, First OFF".

When you turn on the power switch, let the amp run on that for a few minutes to warm up.

When shutting down, hit just the Power switch and then wait for at least three minutes before turning off the Standby switch. Doing this allows the caps to drain properly.

6

L.H.B.
Contributing Member
***

the joisey flats

welcome to the zoo...
Feb 11th, 2012 11:00 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

If you have a GZ34 rectifier, which that year should, then doing it my way will not affect the tubes negatively. GZ34's are indirectly heated and come on slowly giving your power tubes ample time to warm up so this will eliminate any kind of cathode stripping as Dave Funk mentions in his book which I have. Plus, the strain on your standby switch is eliminated increasing its life, as well as gradually charging you power supply caps instead of hammering them with full voltage when the standby switch is flipped.When you shut your amp down with the standby on, your amp will slowly bleed down the voltage out of your caps which will also help with there service life. Anything "abruptly" done concerning electricity is almost never good neither short term or long term. I hope this helps to debunk the urban legends.

mxlplzx
Contributing Member
***

Joysey

Feb 14th, 2012 11:45 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

re: the strain on the standby,

is it true what Gerald Weber says regarding the standby switch, that they were under-equipped for the DC that is on them? One of his QA portions in one of his books indicates swapping it out for a more robust one. I have a 66Pro Rev, and it is the only amp that has that problem for me; same amp in that specific QA entry.

his explanation makes sense, but any real world experience? outside of his real world that is.

Figaro

South Carolina

I kicked cancer's ass!
Feb 15th, 2012 10:16 PM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I've read that you should not leave the amp on standby for too long, like over 5 minutes, between sets, etc... which I think most players do. Not sure why, but it said it's better to just leave it in play mode.

wnstardis
Contributing Member
*******

Chicago, IL USA

Bill~~~
Feb 16th, 2012 06:26 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Just to show you how in the dark we were back when I bought my first Fender amp back in '58 (a Deluxe) I was told that the standby switch was a convenience feature so the performer could get his stuff all set and go on to do other things until when it was time to perform you would hit the standby and go without warmup time. We would also hit the standby between sets so the guitar would not feed back during breaks.

Now, I worked for 40 years as a x-ray service engineer. The industry used tubes extensively so I had constant exposure to them and the only one we would worry about during start up was the actual imaging tube. If you hit a tube with B+ while it is still below operating temperature it IS possible to suck the electron cloud which surrounds the cathode during warmup ( causing cathode stress and eventual failure), but in practice the voltages have to be much, much higher than the voltages in guitar amps (typically above 25,000 volts) for that to start happening. So.... unless your amp is seriously out of spec I don't think that one is damaging the tubes.

My '58 Deluxe is still plugging along after daily use with no special treatment and normal maintenance and still sounds great. During the 60's and early 70's I really beat on this amp without regards to any specific switch sequence with tubes just stuck in without biasing, etc. and not only survived but is still a rugged piece of gear I could rely on gigging daily (if I still did that kind of stuff). Fender amps are really rugged. If there was ever was an atomic war all that would survive would be cockroaches, Twinkies and Fender amps. The only problem might be where to plug it in (LOL).

(This message was last edited by wnstardis at 06:32 AM, Feb 16th, 2012)

6L6
Contributing Member
**********
***

Lago, CA

Kick the tires, Light the fires!
Feb 16th, 2012 08:08 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

"If there was ever was an atomic war all that would survive would be cockroaches, Twinkies and Fender amps..."

Thank the Lord that Twinkies would survive!

6

The True Essence of Life!

Stratopastor

Stockton-on-Tees

Jivin' with cosmik debris since 1955!
Feb 17th, 2012 02:59 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

I'm surprised no-one's mentioned a vital stage in switching off the amp, which would be to switch it all off and then not move it for 5 minutes. Pack something else away while the valves cool a little, thus extending their life.

If we ever find a bunch of cockroaches eating Twinkies and learning guitar, we'll know where the next nuclear threat lies. Mark my words.

SpiroGiro

YorkshireUK

Feb 24th, 2012 09:27 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Actually - your amp tells you what it likes.

If it pops a fuse when under load soon after power up = is not warm enough.

If sounds inarticulate - not warm enough...

If has a louder hum (but later is quieter) - is not warm enough - wait a little longer...

If crackles and pops more when you pluging in/out cables - is not warm enough.

I allow at least 10 mins warm up in room temp and I allow a small cool down in standby before final power off. Moderation of temperature will help save component failure just as leaving a PC on all the time is better for the circuit than constant start ups/close downs.

Stratopastor

Stockton-on-Tees

Jivin' with cosmik debris since 1955!
Feb 25th, 2012 11:27 AM   Edit   Profile   Print Topic   Search Topic

Hey Spiro - greetings from a little further north. Maybe we'll run into each other sometime. Or maybe we'll just pass like... (sorry)

Previous 20 Messages  

FDP Forum / Fender Amps: Vintage (before 1985) / How to properly turn on/off my amp




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